fbpx
Connect with us

Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

The WNBA and social media: blessing or curse?

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Perhaps more than any other pro league, the WNBA has fully embraced social media. It is in the third year of a three-year agreement signed by former president Lisa Borders to live-stream 20 regular-season games on Twitter. Players have used social media as their connection vehicle to fans and others. “Social media has become an essential conduit for players, teams, and the league to engage fans directly and deepen those connections,” WNBA COO Christy Hedgpeth told the MSR. 

Published

on

Las Vegas center Liz Cambage (Courtesy of Twitter)
By Charles Hallman

Perhaps more than any other pro league, the WNBA has fully embraced social media. It is in the third year of a three-year agreement signed by former president Lisa Borders to live-stream 20 regular-season games on Twitter.

Players have used social media as their connection vehicle to fans and others. “Social media has become an essential conduit for players, teams, and the league to engage fans directly and deepen those connections,” WNBA COO Christy Hedgpeth told the MSR.

“I think it is so different for the NBA, NFL, and guys like that,” said Las Vegas guard Kayla McBride.

“I love WNBA Twitter — so many smart, articulate angles and views from a wide variety of writers, coaches, analysts, etc.,” tweeted The Athletic’s Lyndsay D’Arcangelo last week.

“I’m not a big social media person,” Las Vegas Assistant Coach Vickie Johnson admitted. However, “Social media gives our fans a chance to see our players’ personalities and see who they are,” she noted.

But is social media a friend or foe for the W? As much as it has been a boon for the league, unfortunately, it has also exposed the players to “trolls” — people who purposely disrespect anyone who affirmatively tweets about women sports in general and the WNBA in particular.

McBride, for example, got trolled last season when she spoke out on salary inequities. Teammate A’ja Wilson got similar treatment. “There will always be people like that,” McBride said.

Hedgpeth said, “We are exceedingly proud of the women in our league for using their platforms to not only promote the game but also to speak out on issues that are important to them.”

“You can take it as a blessing or a curse,” stated Las Vegas center Liz Cambage, who has drawn her share of trolls last season when she played for Dallas. “I take it as a blessing… I don’t take [negative] comments to heart.”

“I use social media to connect with my fans,” Cambage continued. “They lift me up and I lift them up.”

Social media also makes unintentional stars and goats as well, such as Minnesota’s Lexie Brown. Before the season, she was featured on YouTube after taking on a one-on-one challenge from a former men’s college basketball player. She won, and he got roasted on social media.

“I felt so bad about it,” Brown told me. “He is one of the biggest advocates of women’s basketball. I was supposed to play someone else. Bleacher Report got a hold of it and it went crazy.”

She continued, “I’ve seen some [negative] comments on women’s basketball that I’ve never seen before. But I also saw some positive feedback,” the guard pointed out.

Social media and the WNBA seem to be intrinsically linked for good and bad, like it or not. “It’s like being in the newspaper,” Johnson said. “They can build you up and tear you down.”

Lynx slighted on TV

While nearly every Minnesota Timberwolves game is televised on local cable, the more successful Minnesota Lynx get just over half of their regular-season games shown.

This season, the Lynx will be on local television 19 times out of 34 contests. Comparably, all 34 Indiana games are on television, and Chicago has 23 scheduled televised contests; Phoenix has the lowest with seven.

Before this season, much was ballyhooed of the WNBA’s new contract with CBS Sports Network, televising 40 games. But a closer look shows that unlike ESPN, which has their own announcers doing games, CBSN instead airs the local team’s feed, which gives it a cheap feel.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Economy

Racial disparities make it harder to ‘die well’

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN – RECORDER — African Americans experience an earlier onset and greater risk of what may be referred to as lifestyle-related diseases — cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes. More than 40 percent of African Americans over the age of 20 are diagnosed with high blood pressure, compared to 32 percent of all Americans.

Published

on

Grave (Photo by: rawpixel.com | pexels.com)
By Jason Ashe and Danielle L. Beatty Moody

The world got an idea recently from 92-year-old Buddhist monk and peace activist Thich Nhat Hanh, who popularized mindfulness and meditation in the U.S. The monk returned to his home in Vietnam to pass his remaining years. Many admired his desire to live his remaining time in peace and dignity.

Researchers from the University of California-San Diego recently did a literature search to understand what Americans might consider to be a “good death” or “successful dying.” As can be expected, their findings varied. People’s views were determined by their religious, social and cultural norms and influences.

The researchers urged healthcare providers, caregivers and the lay community to have open dialogues about preferences for the dying process.

As scholars who study social health and human services psychology, we found something missing in these conversations — how race impacts life span. It’s important to recognize that not everyone has an equal chance at “dying well.”

Black population and ill health

Take the disease burden of the African American population.

African Americans experience an earlier onset and greater risk of what may be referred to as lifestyle-related diseases — cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes. More than 40 percent of African Americans over the age of 20 are diagnosed with high blood pressure, compared to 32 percent of all Americans.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that the likelihood of experiencing a first stroke is nearly twice as high for African Americans compared with Whites. African Americans are more than two times more likely to experience a stroke before the age of 55. At age 45, the mortality rate from stroke is three times higher for Blacks compared to Whites.

This disease burden consequently leads to their higher mortality rates and overall shorter life expectancy for Blacks compared to Whites.

And while the life expectancy gap differs by only a few years, 75.3 for Blacks and 78.9 for Whites as of 2016, research suggests that African Americans suffer more sickness. This is due in part to the increased prevalence of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes in this population.

Genetics, biological factors and lifestyle behaviors, such as diet and smoking, help explain a portion of these differences. However, researchers are still learning how race-related social experiences and physical environments affect health, illness and mortality.

Access to health care

One factor is that African Americans have historically underutilized preventive medicine and healthcare services. They also delay seeking routine, necessary health care — or may not follow medical advice.

One study found that during an average month, 35 percent fewer Blacks visited a physician’s office, and 27 percent fewer visited an outpatient clinic compared with Whites. “The only time I go to the doctor is when something is really hurting. But otherwise, I don’t even know my doctor’s name,” said a young African American male during a research study in Chicago.

There are reasons for this mistrust. Researchers who study medical mistrust argue that high-profile cases of medical experiments are still playing a role in how African Americans view healthcare systems and providers.

In the past, physicians have intentionally done harm against people of color. A well-known case is the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis” in African American men, which lasted from 1932 to 1972.

In this clinical study, 399 African American men who had already contracted syphilis were told that they were receiving free health care from the government. In fact, doctors, knowing their critical condition, were awaiting their deaths to subsequently conduct autopsies and study the disease’s progression.

Even though penicillin had been proven to treat syphilis by 1947, these men were denied the treatment.

Why discrimination matters for health

Other studies suggest that regardless of their knowledge of past medical abuse, many African Americans have low levels of trust in medical establishments.

“Doctors, like all other people, are subject to prejudice and discrimination,” writes Damon Tweedy, author of Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine. “While bias can be a problem in any profession, in medicine, the stakes are much higher.”

Unfortunately, these fears are underscored by empirical evidence that African Americans are less likely to receive pain medication management, higher quality care, or survive surgical procedures.

In addition, a growing body of literature has established that experiences of discrimination are extremely harmful to physical and mental health, particularly among African Americans. This research adds to the body of evidence that experiences of discrimination harm people’s health and may contribute to the increased rates of premature decline and death among Blacks.

What does it take to SOTdie well?

As African American scholars, we argue the “art of dying well” may be a distant and romantic notion for the African American community. African Americans are also exposed to earlier and more frequent deaths of close loved ones, immediate family members and friends.

Their increased “vulnerability to untimely deaths,” writes Duke University scholar Karla Holloway, shows African Americans’ lack of access to equitable and fair paths in life.

Before defining “a good death,” American society must first begin to fundamentally address how to promote quality living and longevity across all racial groups.

Story republished with permission from The Conversation.

Jason Ashe is a doctoral student in human services psychology at the University of Maryland. Danielle L. Beatty Moody is an assistant professor of behavioral medicine at the University of Maryland.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Continue Reading

Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Serena Williams gets first Wheaties box cover, hopes to inspire next generation

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion”

Published

on

Wheaties Box Cover with Serena Williams (Photo by: General Mills)

By Paige Elliot

The tennis champ follows in the footsteps of Althea Gibson

Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion

For Williams, the achievement fulfills a long-held goal. “I have dreamt of this since I was a young woman and it’s an honor to join the ranks of some of America’s most decorated athletes,” Williams said in a press release.

One of those decorated athletes includes tennis great Althea Gibson, who became the first Black female tennis player to grace Wheaties cover in 2001.

On Instagram, Williams made sure her 11.1M followers knew the score. “In 2001, Wheaties paid homage to a true champion and an icon by putting her on the cover of a Wheaties Box. Althea Gibson was the FIRST Black Woman tennis player to be on the box. Today, I am honored to be the second.”

Gibson and Williams are among just a handful of Black women to covet a “Breakfast of Champions” cover. Gymnast Dominique Dawes received hers in 1996 and Olympian Jackie Joyner-Kersee in 2004.

“Serena exemplifies all of the personal attributes that Wheaties looks for when choosing who its next champion will be,” stated Wheaties Marketing Manager Tiffani Daniels in a press release. “On the court, she has been named the women’s most valuable player seven times, while off the court she uses her voice to inspire and spark change to make the world a better place.”

Williams, widely considered one of the greatest athletes of all time, is currently competing at Wimbledon in both women’s singles and mixed doubles with Andy Murray. She’s on a quest for a 24th Grand Slam singles title. She’s won 14 Grand Slam doubles titles and four Olympic gold medals.

The limited-edition Wheaties box featuring Williams will be on the shelves for the month of July. “I hope my image on this iconic orange box will inspire the next generation of girls and athletes to dream big,” said Williams.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

Continue Reading

Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Buying a home in a seller’s market

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — For decades, buying a home wasn’t just a goal, it was an expectation — the foundation of the American Dream. And, it was relatively easy to achieve. According to a recent study by real-estate firm Unison, in 1975 the average person could save up enough for a 20-percent down payment in nine years.

Published

on

Photo by: Pixabay | Pexels.com
By Solomon Gustavo

For decades, buying a home wasn’t just a goal, it was an expectation — the foundation of the American Dream. And, it was relatively easy to achieve. According to a recent study by real-estate firm Unison, in 1975 the average person could save up enough for a 20-percent down payment in nine years.

While owning a house remains the single best way of accumulating wealth, it seems much further out of reach today. In the current market, the Unison study reports it would take 14 years to save that 20 percent down payment. In the tougher Minneapolis housing market, it would take 17 years.

It’s even worse for African Americans. In the last 20 years, the homeownership gap between Blacks and Whites has held strong at 30 percent.

Understanding the housing market, particularly since the 2008 crash, has become increasingly intimidating. Finding resources, tips and programs has grown complicated and overwhelmingly cumbersome to the novice or first-time buyer.

That’s where the Minnesota Homeownership Center (MHC) comes in. “It’s not that hard,” said Bill Gray, MHC stakeholder relations director.

“Is the process confusing? Yeah, the process is crazy town. [But] with somebody to walk you through it for free, you can pull it off,” said Gray.

MHC was created to show people with low incomes or those sidelined from homeownership by discrimination that buying a home is achievable, as well as both fiscally practical and advantageous.

For 25 years, the nonprofit has helped people buy homes around the state with such services as an intensive eight-hour homebuyer’s course, along with referrals to advisors and program specialists — all for free.

Trading myths for welcome mats

The organization provides “education and preparation from unbiased sources,” said Gray. “This isn’t education being given by a bank.” MHC works to help prospective buyers see through barriers that may prevent them from moving forward.

“Don’t fall for the myths that cause many people to believe ownership is not for them,” said MHS executive director Julie Gugin. “There’s a wide variety of community-based supports for those ready to start the homeownership journey.”

The biggest misconception is that buyers still need to come up with a 20 percent down payment to buy their home. “Who has $50,000 laying around?” asked Gray.

Instead, the MHC course equips participants with knowledge and resources necessary for successful homeownership. This ranges from how calculating how much house one can afford, learning to read and comprehend real estate-related information, and learning to interpret a house inspector’s evaluation.

Learning such vital information can do wonders in the home-buying process, said prospective homebuyer and MHC class participant Stacie Redmond. The 34-year-old sales associate and mother of three began her housing search shortly after her twins were born, which crowded their two-bedroom South Minneapolis apartment.

Getting ready

Redmond followed tips from the course, like building a $3,000 rainy-day fund to prepare for something like the hot water heater or other large appliance needing to be repaired or replaced — even before making an offer on a home.

Through the course, she was also referred to an MHC partner housing advisor who pulled Redmond’s credit report and identified tips for cleaning it up. The advisor then introduced her to a loan officer who informed her of a network of Minneapolis homebuyer programs.

“Everyone’s coming from a different place,” said Mary Kaluza, a homeownership advisor with MHC partner Lutheran Social Services.

Kaluza said advisors begin finding out what steps a prospective homebuyer has taken so far, what their goals are, what their finances look like, and what resources and programs are available to them.

After getting her finances in order, Redmond was ready to buy a house. But that was only half the battle; then came entering the market. She’s been on the hunt for nearly a year, seeing over 50 homes.

Redmond said she feels it’s actually harder to finally land a home than it is to get in a position buy one. In her experience, sellers see multiple offers almost instantly after putting the house on the market. Her latest lesson, she explained, is not just being in financial position but also being ready to make a move.

But she is hopeful in her search: “The market is switching from a seller’s to a buyer’s market,” said Redmond.

Kaluza said the largest misconception people have coming into homeownership is just how long it takes to become “mortgage ready.” Echoing Redmond, that’s often the easier part.

“Right now, housing prices are so high that it’s really tough for people,” said Kaluza, adding that “houses are moving very, very quickly.”

She said she’s heard “over and over again” from people who find a house, make a quick offer, and still hear back that the house is taken. Kaluza heard of an instance in which a house was put on the market and then taken off within two hours.

In other cases, the competition cranks up the original price of the house, forcing people to drop out of the bidding.

Kaluza said, “People need to be ready to pounce on a home and submit an offer,” but also noted the trend toward making rushed bids is also “really concerning. Somebody might jump on an offer and might miss important steps.”

Buying a home is a long-term investment. Doing something ill-advised, like rushing into buying more house than the buyer can afford, can make life much harder down the road, Kaluza said.

Though people are more cautious now, she noted that many people fell into this trap during the 2008 housing bubble. “In general, I would really urge people to be patient.”

In the meantime, keep saving, and protect your credit by making payments on time and refraining from opening new lines of credit, Kaluza advises. “A home is still middle America’s biggest source of wealth. And it’s important. You don’t want it to be a drain. You want it to work for you.”

This article originally appeared the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

Continue Reading

Black History

Local legend referee excelled in more than sports

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception. The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

Published

on

Jim Robinson (Photo by: Charles Hallman | MSR News)
By Charles Hallman
It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception.

The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

Ed Prohofsky, who succeeded McMoore as MPS AD, saw me attending local basketball coaching clinics and told McMoore about me. Both he and Robinson sit together at Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx games, and this columnist purposely pays his respects to these two elders.

After high school, Robinson was convinced by the late James Griffin, St. Paul’s first Black deputy fire chief, to pursue officiating as a second career and began to ref all over the state of Minnesota. I got to know Griffin, who along with Jimmy Lee was one of the first Black officials in Minnesota. He often advised me on my writing.

I first met Robinson when the late Kwame McDonald, a colleague, mentor and friend, introduced us at the summer league he ran and asked me to coach in the late 1980s. McDonald once coached Lisa Lissimore, the Minneapolis Public Schools(MSHSL) associate director, on the Summit-University women’s basketball team.

Lissimore recommended Robinson for one of the seven NCAA Living Legend awards handed out during the Men’s Final Four in April. She included a Black History Month piece I wrote in 2018 as part of her supporting documentation.

If you’re keeping count, that’s five degrees of separation of James Robinson, the first Black official to referee in the Minnesota State Boys’ Basketball Tournament in the 1970s; in total, he worked seven state tournaments. He refereed both football and basketball for many years in the Twin Cities and throughout Minnesota, then focused solely on hoops both at the high school and college levels.

The Big Ten selected Robinson in 1971 as a basketball official, and he became one of the first Black referees to work Division I sports. He worked Big Ten, Division I, II, and III games for 16 years before a knee injury forced him to retire. He then became a supervisor of officials both for the Big Ten and as MSHSL high school basketball officials coordinator and supervisor ever since.

A longtime advocate for Black officials, Robinson for many years has held officiating camps, helped found a minority officials association in Minnesota, and was a National Federation of Basketball Rules Writing Committee member.

During the late 1960s, local community folk approached Robinson to apply for the director of the Summit University Teen Center, which was developing a new social services concept, the “drop-in center.” He has now been at “The Loft” since 1967.

What I didn’t know about Robinson was that he is a master barber and served on the Minnesota Board of Barber Examiners. I later learned that as a youngster growing up in St. Paul he was the first Black elected as the citywide student chief of the school patrol boys, and as a teenager was selected to attend Minnesota’s Boys State where his peers selected him “Mayor of Boy’s State.”

Robinson’s impressive resume includes inductions into the Minnesota Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Honor and the MSHSL Hall of Fame.

“Who determines a legend?” Robinson, ever modest, responded when asked where the NCAA Living Legend honor ranks. “I would not rank [myself] so high.”

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Continue Reading

Business

Black Business Spotlight: Junita’s Jar

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Junita Flowers has been in the cookie business for the past 10 years. She first launched her successful Favorable Treats in 2009, but an abusive marriage and divorce left her picking up the pieces. Instead of giving up, she relaunched with a purpose.

Published

on

Junita Flowers (Photo by: MSR News Online)

By Stephenetta (isis) Harmon

Junita Flowers has been in the cookie business for the past 10 years. She first launched her successful Favorable Treats in 2009, but an abusive marriage and divorce left her picking up the pieces. Instead of giving up, she relaunched with a purpose.

Her new cookie imprint, Junita’s Jar, not only offers up sweet treats but also provides healing for women affected by relationship violence and prevention for others. Since launching last summer, she’s focused on expanding her reach and using the power of food to connect communities.

The MSR caught up with the cookie entrepreneur to talk about her mission-driven company and her plans to change the world, one cookie at a time.

MSR: So can you tell me a little bit about Junita’s Jar?

Junita Flowers: Our mission is to bake hope into every cookie purchased. We have three different flavors — triple chocolate chip, oatmeal peanut butter chocolate chip, and oatmeal raisin.

We are specifically focused on college students, because the 18 to 24 demographic is the largest impacted by relationship violence. And college students can impact change in our culture — sometimes faster than any other generation — because they’re willing to go against the odds and try things and support each other on a different level.

Ultimately, our goal is to reduce victim-shaming, create allies amongst peers, and then inspire students to take action beyond what we call our “Cookies and Conversation” event.

MSR: What does a Cookies & Conversation event look like?

JF: [Hosts] bring their friends together, they book the space. I bring in a panel of experts, I host the conversation, I bring in the cookies. I have someone that represents mental health talking about trauma, the impact of trauma on the brain, managing stress, and self-care. I have a medical professional [who] talks about what you can expect if you ever find yourself in a situation and what you can expect from the medical community.

And then I have a survivor who is no longer in trauma. If you go volunteer at a shelter, you’re meeting women in trauma and you sometimes don’t relate to them. But if you see a woman that’s now on the other side, you can kind of relate to her, like, “You had a regular relationship like I thought I had.”

We’re really trying to normalize, not so you can be okay with it but to let women know it can happen to any of us. One in four women [are victims of relationship violence]; that’s not just a stat, that’s real.

MSR: What inspired you?
JF: I am a survivor of domestic violence. It’s not a topic that I was necessarily passionate about, but I knew I was passionate about changing women’s lives and I didn’t want anyone to feel the way that I did. I knew that I wanted to create something different, something hope-filled. I didn’t want women to feel the way I did.

MSR: How does all this tie into cookies?

JF: Cooking was my emotional escape. During the craziness of the abusive relationship, I went back to what I knew and what brought me joy as a child — being in the kitchen. I am one of eight [children], and my grandmother used to come over every Wednesday to help my mom prepare meals, so we spent a lot of time in the kitchen making everything from scratch.

It was just the bonding that happened in the kitchen. And cookies are the thing that I decided to do. What fed me in the craziness is what now is going to feed my family and others — literally and figuratively.

Even though we sell cookies, I like to think that we’re a story-sharing platform. We use the cookies as an opportunity to spark conversation.

MSR: What’s next?

JF: I have my next C&C scheduled for August with a student nurses association, and then I have some conversations that I’m super excited about that are coming up that I’m hoping will lead me to my ultimate goal. I want every student-athlete that enters a college campus to go through our conversation series as a part of their orientation — sort of an education and prevention mechanism around sexual and domestic violence. So I’d like to partner with the NCAA.

MSR: Any other goals?

JF: Our tagline is “hope munches on,” so I would like to go around the world speaking and inspiring women — not just about relationship violence, but inspiring women to push beyond boundaries and pursue their purpose, because that’s an area where women tend to struggle the most. You could be 30 or 60 and still struggle with that whole thing around purpose.

MSR: Do you have any plans for retail?
JF: That’s sort of the next step as we build awareness and build our customer base. We’re at the University of Minnesota, in about five stores and the four bookstores on campus, and we’re in a store on Grand Avenue in Saint Paul. Once people are more aware of who Junita’s Jar is, we can have better success once we get on the retail shelves.

MSR: What advice would you give to someone who was looking to start a commercial business combining the social enterprise aspect?

JF: I think it all boils down to your why — why are you in business? How do you know if this is for you, if this is what you want to do? Think if you are really tapping into your “why.” You should dream about your why, research your why, plan your why, execute that why, celebrate that why, and then repeat it.

For more info, visit Junita’s Jar at junitasjar.com.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

Continue Reading

Economy

Black Family Day targets racial disparities

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — The Black Civic Network (BCN) recently hosted Black Family Day to raise awareness of disparities between Black families and their White counterparts.

Published

on

Black Family Day (Photo by: Adrian Mack)
By MSR News Online

The Black Civic Network (BCN) recently hosted Black Family Day to raise awareness of disparities between Black families and their White counterparts.

According to the Institute for Policy Studies’ “The Ever-Growing Gap,” it would take Black families “228 years to amass the same amount of wealth that White families” have today. It was the loud silence on this subject in Minnesota political discourse that drove BCN and our members to the State Capitol,” said BCN founder Nick Muhammad.

The BCN is a political advocacy organization geared toward positively impacting low-income Black families, or American Descendants of Slavery (ADOS), by focusing on repairing and rebuilding family structures and their economic stability.

Muhammad said 50 ADOS families gathered Friday afternoon at the State Capitol to discuss solutions, show there are thriving Black families in Minnesota and focus on repairing and rebuilding family structures and their economic stability.

“It’s imperative that we urgently identify and address the state of the Black family and make concentrated efforts to preserve the Black family,” said Muhammad.

For more info about BCN, visit blackcivicnetwork.org.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Latest News

%d bloggers like this: