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Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved….Fatherhood

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER — This month, the “Take Charge of Your Health Today” page focuses on the health benefits associated with fatherhood.

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Esther L. Bush (Photo by: ulpgh.org)

By Esther Bush

This month, the “Take Charge of Your Health Today” page focuses on the health benefits associated with fatherhood. Erricka Hager, health advocate at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, and Esther L. Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, spoke about this topic.

EH: Good afternoon, Ms. Bush. Today’s topic is quite timely with Father’s Day quickly approaching on June 16. I’m excited to have this conversation with you. Today we’re discussing the health benefits that are associated with the responsibilities of becoming a father. Research has shown that involved fathers positively impact their children’s health. Rarely discussed, however, are the impact and health perks that fatherhood can have on the man’s life.

EB: Yes, Erricka. I’m glad that we are discussing the health benefits of being a family man. As you mentioned, a growing body of research has identified the positive correlation between involved fathers and their children’s health. A study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., concluded that children who have active fathers learn better, have higher self-esteem and are less prone to depression than those who don’t. But research also shows that becoming a dad has a profound impact on the man’s physical and mental well-being. A long-term study by the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Md., found that men with healthy family relationships are less prone to stress-related health problems. And right here at the University of Pittsburgh, pediatric fellow Alicia Boykin, MD, is expanding her research to understand how support affects young fathers under the age of 26.

EH: It is great to see that researchers like Dr. Boykin are expanding their focus. Younger fathers are an understudied and underrepresented population, despite them having similar needs as adolescent and young-adult mothers. However, Dr. Boykin is addressing the research gap with the Young Fathers Study. The purpose of the study is to help researchers learn more about the role that young fathers play in their children’s lives and better understand how health care providers may affect young fathers’ ideas about parenting. Researchers hope their findings will lead to better ways to support young fathers in the future.

EB: Dr. Boykin’s study is very important to mention; thank you, Erricka. However, researchers should be mindful that young fathers may be hard to engage for a variety of reasons. The Urban League can also aid in connecting fathers with support that is available for them.

EH: You’re right, Ms. Bush. And it is so important that our readers continue to volunteer for such research studies so their voices and opinions are included!

EB: This conversation is important, Erricka. Thank you for bringing this topic to the forefront. I hope all of our fathers have a great Father’s Day. I look forward to chatting with you next month about stroke research.

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Family

Why do fewer blacks survive childhood cancers?

MILWAUKEE TIMES WEEKLY — The relationship between race and the outcome for a number of cancers among whites, Hispanics and blacks in the United States have certainly started to become more evident and clearer. A new study finds, poverty is a major reason why black and Hispanic children with some types of cancer have lower survival rates than white patients.

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By The Milwaukee Times Weekly

The relationship between race and the outcome for a number of cancers among whites, Hispanics and blacks in the United States have certainly started to become more evident and clearer. A new study finds, poverty is a major reason why black and Hispanic children with some types of cancer have lower survival rates than white patients.

Researchers examined U.S. government data on nearly 32,000 black, Hispanic and white children who were diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2011. For several cancers, whites were much more likely to survive than blacks and Hispanics.

Rebecca Kehm and her University of Minnesota colleagues wondered whether those differences were due to socioeconomic status – that is, one’s position based on income, education and occupation.

Their conclusion: It had a significant effect on the link between race/ethnicity and survival for acute myeloid leukemia as well as acute lymphoblastic leukemia, neuroblastoma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

For blacks compared to whites, socioeconomic status reduced the link between race/ethnicity and survival by 44 percent and 28 percent for the two leukemias; by 49 percent for neuroblastoma; and by 34 percent for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

For Hispanics compared to whites, the reductions were 31 percent and 73 percent for the two leukemias; 48 percent for neuroblastoma; and 28 percent for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Socioeconomic status was not a major factor in survival disparities for other types of childhood cancer, including central nervous system tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Wilms tumor and germ cell tumors, the researchers said.

“These findings provide insight for future intervention efforts aimed at closing the survival gap,” Kehm said in a journal news release.

“For cancers in which socioeconomic status is a key factor in explaining racial and ethnic survival disparities, behavioral and supportive interventions that address social and economic barriers to effective care are warranted,” she said.

“However, for cancers in which survival is less influenced by socioeconomic status, more research is needed on underlying differences in tumor biology and drug processing,” Kehm added.

For more information on acute myeloid leukemia, visit the Health Conditions page on BlackDoctor.org.

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, Aug. 20, 2018

This article originally appeared in the Milwaukee Times Weekly
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Atlanta Voice

Georgia’s welfare rolls drop sharply in recent years

ATLANTA VOICE — State records show the number of Georgia families receiving welfare benefits has dropped by more than two-thirds in the past 14 years. The numbers have decreased as Georgia has applied constant pressure to drive down the rolls, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

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Georgia State Capitol (Photo by: Wikipedia)

By The Atlanta Voice

State records show the number of Georgia families receiving welfare benefits has dropped by more than two-thirds in the past 14 years.

The numbers have decreased as Georgia has applied constant pressure to drive down the rolls, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The number of households receiving aid from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program has consistently dropped. It even happened during the Great Recession.

State officials say the decreasing rolls are a sign that the program is working.

The trend in Georgia mirrors what has happened across the U.S., the newspaper reported.

After Congress made broad changes to the welfare program in 1996, the number of households receiving benefits has consistently dropped across nationwide. The changes in the 1990s gave states more control over how to run welfare. That resulted in fewer U.S. households receiving benefits.

In Georgia, the Legislature has consistently focused on getting people to work as opposed to providing cash aid, said Fred Brooks, a professor at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

In June 2018, the average welfare recipient received $260 a month, according to Georgia’s Division of Family and Children Services. The amounts, set by the Legislature, haven’t increased with the rate of inflation in recent years, said Jon Anderson, the head of DFCS’ Office of Family Independence.

Georgia lawmakers for years have supported initiatives to limit the number of people receiving public assistance, including attempts to pass legislation that would have required drug testing for Georgians who receive food stamps.

This article originally appeared in the Atlanta Voice

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Defender News Network

Michelle Obama discusses the importance of equality in relationships

DEFENDER NEWS NETWORK — Michelle Obama didn’t hold anything back during a candid sit down with Gayle King over the weekend at Essence Fest. Besides discussing healthy living and her memoir Becoming, the former FLOTUS also spoke about looking forward to having a house without teenagers soon.

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Michelle Obama
By Defender News Service

Michelle Obama didn’t hold anything back during a candid sit down with Gayle King over the weekend at Essence Fest. Besides discussing healthy living and her memoir Becoming, the former FLOTUS also spoke about looking forward to having a house without teenagers soon.

“Barack’s like ‘You seem so much less  stressed,’ and I’m like, duh! Not only were we parenting teenagers, but every Saturday night you had to worry about whether your kid is gonna end up on Page Six,” Obama told King. “Now we’re rediscovering each other. I’m looking over and going ‘Hey…you, where have you been for 21 years?!’”

King even asked the Chitown native about her take on having great sex at every age, which she said she isn’t opposed to at all.

“Yes. I support that principle,” she laughed. “I mean, come on Gayle! What I’m ‘sposed to say to that? ‘No, I take issue with that?’ Yes, Gayle, the answer is yes!”

Mrs. Obama also gave invaluable advice on how to find the right partner. She said the most important factor in sustaining a healthy relationship is equality.

“Equality is not just measured in terms of the wallet. Equality is in terms of the value that they carry. Honesty is the beginning, the middle, and the end. I wouldn’t want to be bothered with someone I couldn’t trust on a day-to-day basis. It’s not just about how much money they make or title. Someone could have the right salary, but the wrong heart.”

Not only did drop some gems, she looked stunning! She rocked her natural curls and slayed in a navy blue, belted, shimmery jumpsuit.

This article originally appeared in the Defender News Network

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Family

Mothers and Daughters ‘Make a Joyful Noise’ at Mount Olive Baptist Church, Clairton

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER — The jubilant faces captured the “Make A Joyful Noise” theme at the Mother-Daughter Musical Extravaganza, held June 9 at Mount Olive Baptist Church, Park Avenue, Clairton.

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The Mother-Daughter Musical Extravaganza at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Clairton, June 9. (Photos by Courier photographer Jacquelyn McDonald)

by Courier Newsroom

The jubilant faces captured the “Make A Joyful Noise” theme at the Mother-Daughter Musical Extravaganza, held June 9 at Mount Olive Baptist Church, Park Avenue, Clairton.

The concept was in the mind of the community’s Patriarch and Host Pastor, Rev. William Callaway and came to fruition with the support of the Clairton church community. The event, which featured six sets of mothers and daughters, kept the crowd on its feet, clapping and cheering, giving perfect pitch to a triumphant time of worship in song.

Dr. Bernadette Jeffrey, associate Evangelist of neighboring Gethsemane COGIC, was Mistress of Ceremony.

– Jacquelyn McDonald

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This article originally appeared in the New Pittsburgh Courier

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African American News & Issues

Houston’s Dynamic Duo – Mother / Son Seek Seats on Houston City Council

AFRICAN AMERICAN NEWS & ISSUES — Does the name “Provost” sound familiar? It certainly should. Provost is synonymous with volunteerism, service and mentoring -all simultaneously. The name Provost is about to become a lot more familiar. Why? I thought you’d never asked. Georgia Provost, who most know as “Mama Pro,” and her son Jerome Provost are running for seats on Houston City Council.

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Georgia Provost and Jerome Provost

By Afram News

Does the name “Provost” sound familiar? It certainly should. Provost is synonymous with volunteerism, service and mentoring -all simultaneously.

The name Provost is about to become a lot more familiar. Why? I thought you’d never asked. Georgia Provost, who most know as “Mama Pro,” and her son Jerome Provost are running for seats on Houston City Council.

Georgia, who is running for City Council, Position 1, amazed over 81,000 votes in a run for City Council in 2015. Endorsed by the Houston Chronicle then as, “an individual who brings grassroots awareness and years of experience helping solve problems in her community.” The Chronicle statement added that “Georgia’s qualifications will prove valuable on the council. “She will speak up for Houstonians too often ignored by city government,” the Chronicle endorsement further stated.

Imagine, if you will, how much stronger Georgia’s voice will be with a seat at the city council table.

Jerome Provost has his heart, sight and mind set on improving the community where he lives, works and where children play. He has walked, talked and worked with community businesses and individuals in the community his entire life and he knows their needs, issues and concerns.

Jerome is not just committed to hearing his constituents. He is committed to addressing their needs, among which are to change the trajectory of District D by pulling investment toward the District for ALL residents to benefit, to bring innovation and creativity to city hall and blight control.

Jerome, who grew up with a successful businessman father (Herbert) and an activist mother (Georgia) has witnessed first hand changes in his own community.I’m pleased with some of the progress that has been made over the years” Jerome asserts. “Yet there are parts of District D that has stopped growing. I want to work hard to assure the District as a whole grows.”

Georgia’s goal is to achieve what she promises on the campaign trail when elected. ” I want to create a network where neighbors are helping neighbors and where everyone grows. My goal,” she says, “is to bridge the gap in Position 1. I plan to be the change I want to see,” this is a promise she plans on keeping…

This article originally appeared in the African American News & Issues.

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#NNPA BlackPress

Did You Insult or Exalt God Today?

NNPA NEWSWIRE — For every quote I could give you right now, there are many of you who could quote at least three more appropriate ones for this message. James 5:15-16 “And prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well; the Lord will raise him up. If he has sinned, he will be forgiven. Therefore, confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you might be healed. The prayer of a righteous man is powerful and effective.

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James A. Washington is a father, husband, Christian, writer, entrepreneur and the owner/publisher of the Dallas Weekly.

Spiritually Speaking…

By James A. Washington, Publisher of the Dallas Weekly News

Have you succumbed to the notion yet that prayer will get you through it? The ‘it’ I’m referring to is EVERYTHING.

If the truth be told and you’re like me, at times you’re not very enthusiastic about your faith. That fire that initially burned in me when I finally met Christ leaves me more cold than hot and I cannot and do not remain constant or consistent in my journey towards eternal salvation.

Have you ever been there? It is then that my prayer life is more often weak not strong. I’ve finally figured out at times like these that if I only do one thing, I have to continue to pray. However casual or cavalier I might think it is, if I do nothing else, I’ve learned that I’ve got to pray my way through it.

If you’ve ever been lost on a nameless highway and know that you’re lost, you probably understand what I’m talking about. No exit, no gas stations, no people or other cars around. No one to ask for directions. You just keep driving and you just keep looking, hoping against hope. It’s just you and the needle on the fuel gauge.

Given your and my circumstances, prayer is probably very appropriate when one is spiritually lost; especially when you are forced to acknowledge that you are. My word to you is to just keep praying.

At this stage of my spiritual development, I can’t think of an alternative. I just so happened to look up prayer in my bible’s Concordance and found out that I’m correct in my assumption that prayer(s), pray(ed), praying, all hold a special place in spiritual history and in the eyes of God.

For every quote I could give you right now, there are many of you who could quote at least three more appropriate ones for this message. James 5:15-16 “And prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well; the Lord will raise him up. If he has sinned, he will be forgiven. Therefore, confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you might be healed. The prayer of a righteous man is powerful and effective.”

I will not sit here and profess to you to be a righteous man. What I will do is profess to you and anyone who will listen that I am a sinner seeking God’s forgiveness.

I am also on record as praying for you, my fellow man, that you too, will understand God’s faithfulness. Mark 11:24-25 “Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it and it will be yours. And when you stand praying, if you hold anything against anyone, forgive him, so that your Father in heaven may forgive you your sins.”

I’m not making this stuff up. This is what the text says. Hopefully, what I’m trying to convey to you is once I was lost. I’m sure I’ll get lost again and when it happens, prayer will continue to lead me home.

It is an irrefutable spiritual fact.

Try it. Speak to God from your heart. Let Him know that you know He knows you are lost. He will then step up and act out on your behalf proclaiming for all to see that you are never really lost and certainly never really alone. He has known where you were from the beginning of time.

May God bless and keep you always.

James A. Washington is a father, husband, Christian, writer, entrepreneur and the owner/publisher of the Dallas Weekly.

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