**FILE** D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine (Courtesy photo)
Business

D.C. AG Racine Leads 38-State Coalition in Support of Marijuana Banking Bill

WASHINGTON INFORMER — An effort aimed at bringing billions of dollars of existing cash transactions into the regulated banking sector has resulted in a coalition of 38 attorneys general who are urging Congress to pass the Secure and Fair Enforcement Banking Act, or SAFE Banking Act,  to allow legal marijuana-related businesses to access the banking system. […read more]

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Photo courtesy of dcjazzfest.org
Entertainment

DC Jazz Festival Announces Lineup

WASHINGTON INFORMER — The DC Jazz Festival, celebrating its 15th anniversary this year, announced the schedule for its 2019 “Jazz in the ‘Hoods” lineup. Presented by Events DC, the festival runs from June 7-16 with an array of music ranging from the traditional to the avant garde, in all four quadrants of the nation’s capital, featuring performances at more than 20 neighborhood venues. […read more]

In addition to the cash and access to an amazing car, full-time sophomores, juniors and seniors attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) who are at least 18 years old, will also experience exciting challenges while discovering and documenting inspirational stories about the African American community. (Pictured from left: 2018 Chevrolet DTU Fellows: Tyvan Burns, Denver Lark, Ila Wilborn, Daja Henry, Diamond Durant, Natrawn Maxwell)
#NNPA BlackPress

Chevrolet and NNPA Discover the Unexpected Journalism Fellowship Launches its Fourth Year!

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Each year since 2016, General Motors’ Chevrolet brand has partnered with the NNPA, a trade association that represents more than 200 African American-owned newspapers and media companies around the country. The Discover the Unexpected Journalism Fellowship provides a $10,000 scholarship, $7,500 stipend and the road trip of a lifetime to between six and eight students selected for the honor. […read more]

#NNPA BlackPress

Chevrolet Partners with America’s Black Publishers to Help HBCU Students Discover the Unexpected

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The Discover the Unexpected Journalism Fellowship (DTU), now entering its fourth consecutive year, provides six HBCU students with scholarships ($10,000 each), stipends ($5,000 each), an eight-week fellowship with two of the nation’s leading Black news publications, and the “road trip of a lifetime” in the all-new 2019 Chevrolet Blazer. […read more]

The DC Department of Aging and Community Living celebrates over 200 D.C. residents who are over 100 years of age. Vanilla Beane, a popular milliner who continues to work in her shop every day was one of those honored at the luncheon held at the Kellogg Conference & Hotel in northeast D.C. on April 29. (Shevry Lassiter/The Washington Informer)
Community

Diverse, Spry Centenarians Hailed at Annual Luncheon

WASHINGTON INFORMER — In the not-too-distant past, if someone reached the age of 100, society considered that person to be ancient and functionally useless. Today, those who reach 100 are not considered to be outliers but a standard of living that should be aspired to. That message came through clearly at the 33rd annual Salute to Centenarians at the Kellogg Conference & Hotel Center on the Northeast campus of Gallaudet University on April 29. […read more]

Courtesy of Pepco Holdings
Energy

Pepco Energy Efforts Receive National Recognition

WASHINGTON INFORMER — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy have presented Pepco with the ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Award. This latest accolade marks the 6th ENERGY STAR award Pepco has received, which recognizes the success of the company’s energy efficiency programs that help provide customers with more control over their energy usage while saving them money as well. […read more]

Protesters march in 2015 past one of 17 predatory lending businesses in South Dallas, Texas. (Courtesy of Paul Malbrough)
Economy

Predatory Lending Rooted in Antebellum South: Study

WASHINGTON INFORMER — A doctoral student at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, recently compiled evidence that traces predatory lending practices to the pre-emancipated South. In her research, Amanda Gibson found that in comparison to today’s standards, in the informal financial world of antebellum Virginia, African Americans were often as collateral for loans or sold to pay off debt. African-Americans were also sometimes participants in the personal side of pre-emancipation credit, usually taking out loans in pursuit of freedom. […read more]

The Maryland Senate holds a session on April 3. (Photo by: William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Washington Informer

Md. Senate OKs ‘Lofty’ Education Plan

WASHINGTON INFORMER — he Maryland Senate voted Wednesday to implement a multimillion-dollar education plan to revamp the state’s public schools, including an expansion of early childhood, school-based health centers and special education programs. The two-year plan, known as the “Blueprint for Maryland’s Future,” would also boost teacher salaries — by 1.5 percent from the state if counties and Baltimore City provide 3 percent. […read more]

Courtesy of Globalizedc.org
Education

Applications Being Accepted for ‘Japan in DC’ Student Summer Program

WASHINGTON INFORMER — Japan in DC, a two-year-old summer enrichment program, gives interested high school students the opportunity to explore and document the presence of Japan in the nation’s capital through its Japan-related individuals, institutions and landmarks. The four-week, project-based program — offered free of charge and touted as fun and experiential — will operate 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Monday-Friday from July 1- 26, tentatively at the Columbia Heights Education Campus in Northwest. […read more]

Courtesy of DiversityInc
Business

Black UPS Employees in Ohio Subjected to Racist Company Culture for Decades: Lawsuit

WASHINGTON INFORMER — A lawsuit filed March 13 in the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas in Toledo states that 19 Black employees at a Maumee location have been subjected to racial harassment and discrimination from white co-workers. This lawsuit included allegations of being passed over for promotions, use of the N-word, and a lack of accountability and disciplinary actions taken by the USP upper management team at the Maumee branch. […read more]

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks during a March 18 press conference in Annapolis on the state's fiscal 2020 budget. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Government

Hogan Blasts Legislature as Assembly Nears End

WASHINGTON INFORMER — With less than a month before the Maryland General Assembly’s 90-day session ends, Gov. Larry Hogan didn’t mince words Monday at a press conference. He pleaded with the majority Democratic legislature to approve legislative that hold school systems accountable, cut taxes and eliminate mandate spending that would cause an average $7,000 tax hike for homeowners. […read more]

You or your child may disregard subjects like science, technology, engineering and math in school now, but they could be the ticket to a better life.
#NNPA BlackPress

HOLLIE: STEM — Another Way Out for African Americans

WASHINGTON INFORMER — STEM, which stands for science, technology, engineering and math are subjects being touted by the educational sector to help propel kids into careers that will soon, if not already, dominate industries across the country. Real jobs, with real salaries, and a real path to develop a sustainable future. Contrary to what some people say – it’s not nerds who hold these positions – it’s smart people, making a good living. […read more]

Members of the Majestic Knights football team asked to take a photo with Valerie Castile, center, mother of Philando Castile, her first born son who was killed in 2016 by police during a traffic stop. She gave them advice on ways to stay safe when confronted by the police. / Photo by DR Barnes.
#NNPA BlackPress

Mother of Philando Castile brings a hopeful message to D.C. students

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Castile’s firstborn son Philando worked in the Minnesota school system as a cook until he was killed by police during a traffic stop on July 6, 2016. The incident was highly controversial as the police alternately claimed that Castile had a broken taillight and also that he “fit the description” of a robbery suspect who had a wide-set nose. […read more]

Community

A Legacy Realized: Dr. Henry A. Wise High School pays tribute to the school’s first and only football coach

WASHINGTON INFORMER — In this week’s episode, Dr. Henry A. Wise High School pays tribute to the school’s first and only football coach with a truly unique honor. In addition to honoring their coach, the school also pays tribute to the widow of the school’s namesake who just recently celebrated her 100th birthday. It is a special night in Upper Marlboro in this week’s episode of PG13. […read more]

Commentary

THE RELIGION CORNER: Take Domestic Violence Month Seriously

WASHINGTON INFORMER — Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women — more than car accidents, muggings and rapes combined. Statistics show that every nine seconds in the U.S. a woman is assaulted or beaten; around the world, at least one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. Most often, the abuser is a member of her own family. […read more]

Donald Trump speaking to supporters at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona.
Commentary

COMMENTARY: Only Imbeciles Ignore the Impact of Global Warming

WASHINGTON INFORMER — So, why won’t Donald Trump, ranking members of the Republican Party, and power brokers from around the globe use their abilities to evoke swift and sudden change and save the world’s fragile ecosystem? Why is America insistent on continuing the use of fossil fuels so that those who sell or buy them can remain financially solvent and economically satisfied — but to the detriment of today’s and tomorrow’s generations? […read more]

With 40% of Americans supporting the president’s rhetoric and policies, America remains extremely divided. (Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons)
Commentary

COMMENTARY: Are Blacks Warming Up to Trump?

WASHINGTON INFORMER — For the record, since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began tracking unemployment statistics based on race in the 1970s, the rate of Black unemployment today, 5.8 percent (compared to the overall unemployment rate of 3.8 percent) is at its lowest percentage ever. However, economists emphasize that the downward trend first began under President Barack Obama, further noting that the numbers do not take into consideration those who have stopped looking for work, many of whom are Black. […read more]

#NNPA BlackPress

Howard U. Cancer Center Expands Blacks’ Access to Clinical Trials

WASHINGTON INFORMER — “Howard University’s Cancer Center serves a population that is around 90 percent African American,” said Carla D. Williams, Howard University associate professor of medicine and public health and interim director of the Howard University Cancer Center. “For many of the cancers that we commonly treat, this group has some of the highest mortality rates of any racial or ethnic group…” […read more]