Mona Fouad, M.D., professor, founding director of UAB’s Minority Health & Health Disparities Research Center and senior associate dean. (Bernard Troncale Photo, For The Birmingham Times)
Health

Dr. Mona Fouad’s team named winner of UAB’s Inaugural Grand Challenge

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — The diseases are familiar. So are the state’s rankings. Alabama ranks 46th in obesity, 48th in diabetes, and 49th in high blood pressure, among other metrics. Turning these numbers more favorable is a grand challenge that Mona Fouad, M.D., director of the UAB Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Center — and her team — have accepted. […read more]

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Photo: From L-R: Angela Marshall, Chair, Board of Directors, BWHI, Linda Goler Blount, President & CEO, BWHI, Virginia Harris, President, NCBW, Seretha Tinsley, 1st Vice President of Programs, NCBW, Stacey D. Stewart, President, March of Dimes, and Mia Keeys, Health Policy Advisor to Congresswoman Robin Kelly (D-IL)/Courtesy of The Black Women’s Health Imperative
#NNPA BlackPress

Black Women’s Health Imperative Announces Strategic Partnership

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Our strategic partnerships with progressive and powerful organizations like the National Coalition of 100 Black Women are vital to achieving our mission because they provide the amplification needed to reach more Black women with life-saving information and resources,” said Linda Goler Blount, President & CEO, The Black Women’s Health Imperative. […read more]

Dr. Anisa Shomo is the Director of Family Medicine Scholars at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio and is a health columnist for the NNPA.
#NNPA BlackPress

African American Heart Health Is Vital

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Generally, heart disease is considered a man’s disease, but more Black and White women die of heart disease than all cancers combined. About 610,000 men and women die of heart disease each year and it accounts for 1 in 4 deaths in both genders. Coronary Heart Disease is the most common type and accounts for over half of these deaths. Coronary heart disease increases the risk for heart attacks and over 700,000 Americans have heart attacks each year. […read more]

Health

You’re Not Disabled. You Eat Junk.

  (Bloomberg View) – The decision by Europe’s highest court that obesity can be a disability will only make a bad problem worse. Too many people in rich countries are already overweight. Giving them legal grounds to feel righteous about their condition, regardless of its causes, will almost certainly expand their ranks. Read More

Health

Study, Obesity Surgery Cuts Cancer Risk

(NNPA)—In addition to treating morbid obesity, bariatric surgery also reduces the risk of cancer in obese patients, according to a new study published in Obesity Surgery. The team of Brazilian researchers at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul found that the average rate of cancer among obese Read More

Health

Is Healthy Obesity a Myth?

[WebMD] WEDNESDAY, April 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Can someone be obese and healthy? A new study and several experts say no. An obese person who has normal blood pressure, normal cholesterol and normal blood sugar levels is still at risk for heart disease, Korean researchers report in the April 30 online edition Read More

Health

3 Factors Detrimental to Obesity-Related Heart Disease

[FoodProductDesign.com] BOSTON—High blood pressure, serum cholesterol and blood glucose explain approximately 50% of the increased risk of heart disease and three-quarters of the increased risk of stroke among overweight or obese individuals, according to a new study published in the journal The Lancet. Researchers at Harvard Read More

Health

Doctors are told to get serious about obesity

MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer ATLANTA (AP) — Next time you go for a checkup, don’t be surprised if your doctor gets on your case about your weight. The medical profession has issued new guidelines for fighting the nation’s obesity epidemic, and they urge physicians Read More

Technology

Docs to Parents: Limit Kids’ Texts, Tweets, Online

by LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer CHICAGO (AP) — Doctors 2 parents: Limit kids‘ tweeting, texting & keep smartphones, laptops out of bedrooms. #goodluckwiththat. The recommendations are bound to prompt eye-rolling and LOLs from many teens but an influential pediatricians group says parents need to know Read More