#NNPA BlackPress

PRESS ROOM: Professor Dr. Michael Eric Dyson Launches “Conversation Peace,” His First-Ever Tour of HBCUs

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Conversation Peace” is designed to illuminate the historical and current relationship between African Americans and Jews, and spur spirited discussion and dialogue among student guests. The “Conversation Peace” HBCU tour is a presentation of the Philos Project, a national organization part of whose vision and objective is to reach young people—notably future black thought-leaders—to build stronger alliances and foster a better understanding of Israel and geo-political issues. […read more]

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Politics

Many Blacks Don’t Like Obama’s Role as ‘Lecturer-in-Chief’

by Freddie Allen NNPA Washington Correspondent WASHINGTON (NNPA) – The condescending, lecturer-in-chief rhetoric that President Obama reserves for Black audiences is beginning to irritate an increasing number of African-Americans, his most loyal voting bloc. Through intermittent rain, President Obama implored Morehouse College graduates to commit Read More

National

Cross Words between Pastor, Morehouse President

by Larry Miller and Ayana Jones Special to the NNPA from the Philadelphia Tribune PHILADELPHIA (NNPA) – What started out as a respectful article critical of the lack of qualified African-American appointees in President Barack Obama’s cabinet and a perceived lack of policies specifically designed Read More

Op-Ed

CHILD WATCH: Missing Leadership and Core Values

By Marian Wright Edelman NNPA Columnist   “It will not be sufficient for Morehouse College, for any college, for that matter, to produce clever graduates, men fluent in speech and able to argue their way through; but rather honest men, men who can be trusted Read More

Op-Ed

Building Forever Capacity at and Beyond Morehouse College

  By John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. NNPA Guest Columnist Mordecai Wyatt Johnson, the first African American president of Howard University, had a keen and prophetic understanding of the challenging context within which the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities [HBCUs] must operate. Back in 1928, Read More