Rep. Wilson is the founder of the 50 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project of Miami and Jacksonville, Fla. The Role Models Excellence Project coordinator Marcus Bright and a student are scheduled to participate in the announcement of H.R. 1636 with Rep. Wilson.
#NNPA BlackPress

Florida Rep. Frederica Wilson Puts Focus on Social Status of Black Men and Boys

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “It’s not easy being black and male in America. Despite historic gains made in the last 50 years, black males from all walks of life continue to face challenges and hardships that have created significant disparities in the areas that are most critical to ensuring that our boys have equal opportunities to develop the skills required to become successful men,” said Rep. Frederica Wilson in a statement on May 13. […read more]

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Dallas Post Tribune

5 Ways Climate Change Affects The Mental Health Of Young People

DALLAS POST TRIBUNE — The European Parliament’s recent ban on single-use plastic products was hailed as a positive step in the world’s battle against climate change.Yet at the same time, younger generations around the world want to see more government action. Deeply concerned about their future as dire forecasts of a worsening environment continue, students from across the globe keep protesting. And while the threats often associated with climate change are to physical health, homes, the air, water, and economy, psychologists says the toll it takes on young people’s mental health can’t be ignored. […read more]

Mona Fouad, M.D., professor, founding director of UAB’s Minority Health & Health Disparities Research Center and senior associate dean. (Bernard Troncale Photo, For The Birmingham Times)
Health

Dr. Mona Fouad’s team named winner of UAB’s Inaugural Grand Challenge

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — The diseases are familiar. So are the state’s rankings. Alabama ranks 46th in obesity, 48th in diabetes, and 49th in high blood pressure, among other metrics. Turning these numbers more favorable is a grand challenge that Mona Fouad, M.D., director of the UAB Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Center — and her team — have accepted. […read more]

Elijah Cummings courtesy photo
Government

Rep. Elijah Cummings Releases Report on the Soaring Prices of Diabetes Drugs in his District

LOS ANGELES SENTINEL — Congressman Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), Chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, released a Committee Staff Report on the prices of diabetes drugs for seniors and the uninsured in Maryland’s 7th Congressional District. More than 30 million people in the United States, including more than one in four seniors, have diabetes. Patients with diabetes rely on prescription drugs, including insulin, to help manage their conditions. […read more]

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Advice

Have Too Many Bad Habits? Here Are 6 Ways To Create Good Ones

PASADENA JOURNAL — It’s said that we become our habits. In some cases that is not a good thing; bad habits prevail among many Americans. One report found that over 70 percent of US adults have at least one unhealthy behavior associated with chronic health problems. Breaking bad habits isn’t easy, but sometimes the best answer is replacing them with empowering new habits that bring positive changes to one’s daily life. […read more]

LL Cool J (Photo credit: Xavier Collin/Image Press Agency/Splash News)
Health

LL Cool J reveals how cancer has touched him

ROLLINGOUT.COM — LL’s wife, Simone Smith, was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, a rare bone cancer, in 2004, and had to undergo a 15-hour operation to have her right tibia removed and replaced with her left fibula, a steel rod, screws, nails and micro veins from her other leg, but when doctors explained the procedure, her now 51-year-old husband instantly offered to donate the bone from his own limb instead because he thought it would be “stronger.” […read more]

John Singleton was a featured speaker at the Rolling Out Innovation Digital Entertainment (RIDE) conference in 2017. (Photo credit: Steed Media Group)
Film

John Singleton and 5 things Black men need to know to avoid a stroke

ROLLINGOUT.COM — Oscar-nominated director John Singleton remains hospitalized in intensive care after suffering a stroke, according to numerous media outlets. As such, the 51-year-old director has become part of an alarming health statistic, as Black men are twice as likely to suffer strokes than their White counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. […read more]

Glenn Ellis
Health

OP-ED: Unhealthy state of affairs regarding Black health

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — There is no disagreement that African Americans have worse health outcomes across the board. Researchers, scientists, sociologists, and doctor all agree. Data and statistics reflect the dismal reality that if you are African American, you will be more likely to die at birth, die giving birth, grow up sicker, be diagnosed of a life-threatening illness later, and die sooner. […read more]

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Black Voice News

Vulnerable Seniors Remain at Risk, Waiting for State Legislators to Act

BLACK VOICE NEWS — On or about October 15, 2018, a patient with a chronic illness confined to the Legacy Post-Acute Rehabilitation facility in San Bernardino, was observed at about 8:30 am that morning with his/her feeding formula hung on a pole with tubing connected to the resident’s stomach through a feeding pump. The pump was beeping, and the screen indicated a “Hold Error,” i.e. the pump was set in the pause mode. […read more]

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Community

Roundtable participants address challenges, opportunities

DEFENDER NEWS NETWORK — In preparation for the upcoming State of Black Women Summit, the Defender Network and the Barbara Jordan Institute at Texas Southern University hosted more than 100 Houston-area women. The goal of the State of Black Women Roundtable, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas-Houston Branch, was to develop a list of the most pressing issues for the summit, […read more]

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Dallas Post Tribune

DEAR DIETITAN: Cancer and Nutrition

DALLAS POST TRIBUNE — Conversely, there is a lot of misinformation on nutrition, especially when it comes to cancer.  Cancer patients are sometimes afraid and vulnerable, which may make them susceptible to quack nutrition.  Remember we live in a “let the buyer beware” society, and there is nothing in the First Amendment that requires free speech to include the truth. […read more]

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Charleston Chronicle

PRESS ROOM: New Study Identifies Potential Treatment For Higher Rate Of Preterm Birth Among African American Women

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — It may be possible to lower the high risk of preterm birth among African American women with certain immune and bacterial factors in the microbiome of the cervix and vagina that appear to modulate this risk, according to new research published in Nature Communications. March of Dimes, the leading nonprofit for the health of moms and babies, sponsored research at their Prematurity Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine that helped lay the foundation for these recently reported findings.  […read more]

Health

Aspirin’s Risks May Outweigh Benefits: Report

WASHINGTON INFORMER — Heart disease experts assert in a new report that taking a daily dose of aspirin to prevent heart attacks may not be as productive as previously believed. The report, from the American College of Cardiology, states that aspirin “should be used infrequently” for the purpose of preventing cardiovascular disease “because of lack of net benefit” for most adults. […read more]

Featured

Safe and Sane: Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or Dementia

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — Nearly 6 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is expected to increase to nearly 14 million by 2050. Aside from the disease’s burden to the patient, it also impacts family caregivers. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 16.1 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias, accounting for an estimated 18.4 billion hours of care. […read more]

Education

Serve and Return – Building Your Baby’s Brain

LOS ANGELES SENTINEL — Science has shown that healthy brain development depends upon ongoing conversations and interactions between an adult and a child. This process of “serve and return,” where an infant “serves” through gestures, cries or coos, and an adult “returns” by acknowledging and responding in a positive manner, is critical for building neural connections and language development. […read more]

VOA staff: Dorothea Harris, Valorie Jones, Dr. Kevin Brown, Zamzam Ahmed and Monisha Washington
Community

South Side celebrates neighborhood pride, healthy aging

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — South Minneapolis’ unofficial annual community reunion kicked off Saturday, September 1 with an afternoon of family, free food and fun at Phelps Park. The ninth annual Southside Back in the Day Community Celebration was an old (and new) school jam of residents from Phelps, King, Bryant and Central neighborhoods showing off their Southside pride. […read more]