Dr. Unique Morris-Hughes, of DOES (Center) with high school apprenticeship participants and staff. (Courtesy Photo)
Afro

DOES Helps High School Students and Adults Find Apprenticeships

THE AFRO — Started in 2017, the Apprenticeship D.C. initiative was designed to offer viable alternative career pathways to traditional four-year colleges. An apprenticeship can run from one to five years depending on the occupation. After completion of the apprenticeship program, graduates receive a nationally recognized completion certificate. […read more]

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Scholarship award winners with members of the Birmingham Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. (Ameera Steward Photo, The Birmingham Times)
Divine 9

29 area students get scholarships from Birmingham Alumnae Chapter of Deltas

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — Matilda Merriweather, president of The Birmingham Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, said the scholarships reflected the hard work of the winners.“ You’ve come this far by faith, leaning on the Lord and trusting in his holy word knowing that He has not failed you yet and He will continue to help you and when you leave this place, when you leave high school, and or college,” she told the students, parents and chapter members decked out in red. “Remember failure is not an option, make sure you make your parents proud.” […read more]

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Crime

Cummings, Nadler, Bass, and Booker Reintroduce the Record Expungement Designed to Enhance Employment Act

LOS ANGELES SENTINEL — Representatives Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), Chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform; Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Chairman of the House Committee on the Judiciary; and Karen Bass (D-CA), Chairwoman of the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security; reintroduced the Record Expungement Designed to Enhance Employment (REDEEM) Act on the last day of Second Chance Month. U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) plans to reintroduce the bill in the Senate in the coming weeks. […read more]

Education

B-CU sponsors summer youth accountancy program

FLORIDA COURIER — Bethune-Cookman University will hold an Accounting Careers and Awareness Program (ACAP) Residency Week from June 23 to June 28. The program prepares students to pursue higher education by learning about the college application process, financial aid requirements, and scholarships. It will also inform students about the career opportunities available in accounting, finance, and business, and teach them interview skills, résumé building, and dining etiquette. […read more]

Photo by: theoklahomaeagle.net
Crime

Bill Allowing Oklahoma Teachers To Carry Guns Without Special Training Advances

OKLAHOMA EAGLE —  A bill that would allow teachers and other school staff to carry guns without special training advances to the Senate floor. Right now, school personnel can carry guns concealed on campus if they have the permission of their districts; if they have completed CLEET training and possess a valid armed security guard license or hold a valid reserve peace officer certification. This bill would reduce those requirements to just having a districts permission, and a valid weapons permit. […read more]

Black Americans have been the most frequent victims of hate crime in every tally of bias incidents generated since the FBI began collecting such data in the early 1990s… (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
#NNPA BlackPress

Hate Crimes and Solutions offered by Activists

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Phyllis G. Williams, the co-host of the podcast “Living the Principles,” said one reason hate crimes are increasing is that criminals of those actions typically gain notoriety. “Hate crimes with mass media exposure are nothing shy of a recruiting tool. This is why we have seen an increase over the last few years,” Williams said. […read more]

Photo by: milwaukeetimesnews.com
Education

MPS students promote peace through United Nations world fair

MILWAUKEE TIMES WEEKLY — Students from 13 MPS schools took charge of the UWM Panther Arena on April 11 to share their knowledge of countries across the globe. Student displays included photos, maps, and important facts about each country and culture. Projects dug deep to explore the strengths and challenges of each nation and the role each country plays in its region or continent. The world fair was the culmination of the year’s United Nations Schools of International Learning (UNSIL) program, which is implemented in 13 MPS schools. […read more]

When they are continually designated at “below basic” on standardized tests and their culture not understood by teachers and test makers, their behaviors are almost self-fulfilling prophesies. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
#NNPA BlackPress

COMMENTARY: Classroom Culture Clashes

NNPA ESSA MEDIA AWARENESS CAMPAIGN — …in answer to the question when cultures clash in the classroom, who suffers, we all do! Poorly educated students make for a society that alienates its young, one that is unable to retain skilled and experienced teachers, and a country frustrated with unemployment, under-employment, and an ever-growing culture of violence, fear, and intolerance. Court systems and privatized prisons, along with mortuaries, result when the classrooms act as prep schools for these expensive alternatives. […read more]

Photo: From L-R: Angela Marshall, Chair, Board of Directors, BWHI, Linda Goler Blount, President & CEO, BWHI, Virginia Harris, President, NCBW, Seretha Tinsley, 1st Vice President of Programs, NCBW, Stacey D. Stewart, President, March of Dimes, and Mia Keeys, Health Policy Advisor to Congresswoman Robin Kelly (D-IL)/Courtesy of The Black Women’s Health Imperative
#NNPA BlackPress

Black Women’s Health Imperative Announces Strategic Partnership

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Our strategic partnerships with progressive and powerful organizations like the National Coalition of 100 Black Women are vital to achieving our mission because they provide the amplification needed to reach more Black women with life-saving information and resources,” said Linda Goler Blount, President & CEO, The Black Women’s Health Imperative. […read more]

Alabama State President Dr. Quinton Ross Jr. (left) and Lawson State President Dr. Perry Ward sign memorandum of understanding between the two institutions. (Photo by: Ameera Steward | The Birmingham Times)
Education

Lawson State, Alabama State announce historic partnership

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — Students obtaining an associate’s degree at Lawson State Community College (LSCC) can simultaneously work on a bachelor’s at Alabama State University (ASU), presidents of the two institutions announced on Monday. LSCC President Dr. Perry Ward and ASU President Dr. Quinton Ross Jr. announced the memorandum of understanding during a press conference at Lawson State. […read more]

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Economy

$62B Education Cuts Proposed, College Aid Could be Slashed

PRECINCT REPORTER GROUP NEWS — Every budget defines priorities and values. To put it another way, what’s really important in life gets supported financially. For many families, having a home, food, and utilities usually rank pretty high. Then there are other budgetary concerns like saving for college or having a ‘rainy day’ fund to cover less frequent costs that can be much higher than the size of the next pay check. […read more]

The Maryland Senate holds a session on April 3. (Photo by: William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Washington Informer

Md. Senate OKs ‘Lofty’ Education Plan

WASHINGTON INFORMER — he Maryland Senate voted Wednesday to implement a multimillion-dollar education plan to revamp the state’s public schools, including an expansion of early childhood, school-based health centers and special education programs. The two-year plan, known as the “Blueprint for Maryland’s Future,” would also boost teacher salaries — by 1.5 percent from the state if counties and Baltimore City provide 3 percent. […read more]

Photo by: defendernetwork.com
Community

Roundtable participants address challenges, opportunities

DEFENDER NEWS NETWORK — In preparation for the upcoming State of Black Women Summit, the Defender Network and the Barbara Jordan Institute at Texas Southern University hosted more than 100 Houston-area women. The goal of the State of Black Women Roundtable, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas-Houston Branch, was to develop a list of the most pressing issues for the summit, […read more]

Courtesy of Globalizedc.org
Education

Applications Being Accepted for ‘Japan in DC’ Student Summer Program

WASHINGTON INFORMER — Japan in DC, a two-year-old summer enrichment program, gives interested high school students the opportunity to explore and document the presence of Japan in the nation’s capital through its Japan-related individuals, institutions and landmarks. The four-week, project-based program — offered free of charge and touted as fun and experiential — will operate 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Monday-Friday from July 1- 26, tentatively at the Columbia Heights Education Campus in Northwest. […read more]

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Economy

Planters EMC offers scholarships

THE TRUE CITIZEN — Planters Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is accepting applications for the Planters EMC Scholarship. All high school seniors who are the son or daughter of a Planters EMC member are eligible to apply. Applications must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 12, 2019, to be eligible for the randomly drawn scholarship. […read more]

Currently, Byron Bradford (pictured) is facing two opponents in his bid for Place 5 on the Plano City Council. Ron Kelley and Shelby Williams are also on the ballot for the election which will be decided on May 4. (PHOTO: Briget Murphy/NDG)
#NNPA BlackPress

After serving country for 28 years, Bradford seeks to serve residents of Plano

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The upcoming municipal elections will not be Byron Bradford’s first go-around in the political arena. During the 2018 election cycle, Bradford challenged Republican Duncan Webb for the Precinct 4 chair on the Collin County Commissioners Court. He fell 5 points short in that bid against an incumbent who had run unopposed twice previously, but says the experience prepared him well for future runs. […read more]

Black Voice News

Bumps, Bruises and Scratches at Preschool

BLACK VOICE NEWS — The life of a preschooler is filled with arts, crafts, indoor and outdoor play, making new friend and yes, band-aids and ouch reports, yet when parents decide to send their children to preschool for the first time, one of the most important considerations is that that their children are safe from harm. […read more]

Census data are inherently personal; the data record and codify individual stories, and help to paint a mosaic of rich racial, ethnic, cultural, and geographic identities (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
#NNPA BlackPress

Census 2020: For all to count, all must be counted

NNPA NEWSWIRE — … the census over-counted non-Hispanic Whites in 2000 and 2010. And because the people who are more likely to be missed do not live in the same neighborhoods as those more likely to be double-counted, some communities get more than their fair share of political representation and resources, while others get less than they deserve and need, said Terri Ann Lowenthal, a consultant to many census stakeholders and former staff director for the U.S. House Subcommittee on Census and Population, adding that we then must live with those results for the next ten years. […read more]

Dallas ISD poetry slam
Art

Students use the power of poetry to win grand slam scholarships

DALLAS POST TRIBUNE — The inaugural Dallas ISD poetry slam was nothing short of a memorable night at the Edison Learning Center as infectious energy filled the auditorium with excited students, proud parents, and supportive peers. Participating students competed for $10,000 in scholarship awards through a generous donation from business entrepreneur, Roland Parrish. His charitable contribution provides a stepping stone for kids to achieve opportunities in higher education. […read more]

Norfolk Mayor Kenneth Alexander (center) leads NSU and Norfolk CIty officials in historic ribbon cutting (Photo by: NSU)
Business

Norfolk And NSU Partner On Downtown Presence For University

NEW JOURNAL AND GUIDE — Norfolk State University (NSU) has emerged as an important cog in the city of Norfolk’s and the region’s educational and job creation machinery. Members of NSU’s business school faculty and administration joined Norfolk city leaders recently to put that reputation on dismay as they cut the ribbon on the new Norfolk State University Innovation Center (NSUIC) – On the Main. […read more]

Community

NCNW View Park Section to Award Multiple College Scholarships at “The Purple Hat Affair High Tea” Fundraiser

LOS ANGELES SENTINEL — California students rank well below the national average on the National Assessment of Educational Progress in reading. According to research by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, children who do not read proficiently by 3rd grade are more likely to fall behind academically and dropout of high school compared to their peers who are reading at grade level. Volunteers from NCNW tutor students 6-12 years of age on a weekly basis to ensure students are reading at grade-level proficiency according to the California of Student Assessment Performance and Progress standards. […read more]

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Economy

The high costs of student loan debt

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — For the Class of 2018, the average student borrower graduated with a debt of $29,800 in private and federal loans over the course of a bachelor’s degree. This is in addition to $35,600 in federal Parent PLUS loans approximately 14 percent of parents took out to support their children. […read more]

Doris Hill (third from left) teaches a message of empowerment born out of adversity. “If you want to live, we have to act like we want to live. We can’t sit around waiting to die. Live every minute that the Lord gives you breath,\" she said. (Courtesy photo)
#NNPA BlackPress

Amid adversity, Doris Hill says, ‘act like we want to live’

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Mark Twain said the two most important days in a person’s life is the day they were born, and the day they figure out why,” Doris Hill told those gathered for an event hosted by Pink With A Purpose, a non-profit offering support and resources for cancer patients.. “I am so grateful that a year before my husband was tragically killed, I figured out my ‘Why.’ The Lord wanted me to plant the seeds that became the ESPN Academy, our after-school program for students on all grade levels.” […read more]

“I believe that we are in a situation with our city where we can’t wait for change,” said Shelby County Commissioner Tami Sawyer, now an announced candidate for mayor. (TSD File Photo: Lee Eric Smith)
#NNPA BlackPress

With confidence and ‘courage,’ Tami Sawyer declares candidacy for Memphis mayor

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “I am running now because when I see our city and I see our people and I look at the conversations that we are having at high levels of leadership, it doesn’t incorporate what is next for the impoverished, people of color, women, every person that is not considered in our vision for Memphis,” said Shelby County Commissioner Tami Sawyer, director of diversity and cultural competence for Teach for America in Memphis. […read more]

Commentary

#StayWokeOklahoma #WeVoteWeWin: The Oklahoma Eagle Editorial Political Endorsements

OKLAHOMA EAGLE — After weighing the wildly different candidacies of republican Kevin Stitt and Democrat Drew Edmondson it was clear the biggest and most significant difference was their view toward education. Oklahoma is at critical crossroads and most people see the state’s long and painful destruction of education as a cataclysmic crisis. Perhaps no other issue reveals the deep divide in how Oklahoma views government than education. It’s time for a change. […read more]

Wells Fargo has been in Washington, D.C., since 1914, with its first location on G Street NW. Since then, local investments in the District have included support for education, the arts and neighborhood revitalization, among other community needs.
Business

PRESS ROOM: Wells Fargo Invests $1.6 Billion to Help Revitalize D.C.’s Minority Neighborhoods

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The bank’s new commitment includes a five-year, $16 million philanthropic commitment more than triples Wells Fargo’s local giving, with a specific focus on Ward 7 and Ward 8. This philanthropy includes $4 million for Community Development Financial Institutions to grow the small business community and $6 million for nonprofit housing initiatives like down payment assistance and development of affordable rental properties. […read more]