Official ballot for the 2000 United States Presidential election, November 7, 2000, from Palm Beach County, Florida. (Photo source: Wikimedia Commons)
Featured

The Florida Election & the Ghost of Gore-Bush

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “I am replacing my words of concession with an uncompromised and unapologetic call that we count every single vote,” Andrew Gillum said. “We’ve learned in various parts of this state that there are still votes that are outstanding. There’s even still in parts of this state some uncertainty around the total number of votes that are remaining to be cast.” […read more]

Race was also a factor in the first debate, when Tallahassee Mayor, Andrew Gillum confronted Representative Ron DeSantis about his earlier “monkey it up” comment.
Miami Times

Race issues big part of Florida governor’s race

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “…race became a theme throughout the contest between the two candidates, reflecting a national tone of intolerance between Americans with ideological and obvious differences such as skin color and place of origin. The bitter battle between Gillum and DeSantis was overshadowed last week when intolerance manifested itself on Oct. 24, the day of the scheduled, second debate.” […read more]

Former President Barack Obama, Vice President Pence and Oprah Winfrey have traveled to Georgia to campaign for Stacey Abrams, turnout votes and focus on early voting.
Black History

Election Day 2018: Three key statewide contests featuring an African American running for Governor

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “In a race marred by blatant examples of voter suppression and voting machine irregularities the NAACP Georgia State Conference partnering with Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law won an injunction against the use of the controversial voter regulating software – Exact Match,” noted the NAACP in a November 2 press release. […read more]

Polls proved to be wildly inaccurate and the numbers completely misread how well Gillum, Tallahassee’s mayor, would eventually fare in the primary. He won.
Commentary

A Black man who could become Florida’s next governor

NNPA NEWSPAPER — “Nationally, a confluence of factors, including a surge of political grassroots activism, resistance to the odious policies emanating from the White House and record numbers of women – particularly Black women and women of color – has resulted in these groups and individuals not just mobilizing and organizing but also running for office. This groundswell has changed the face of the election landscape.” […read more]

(Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
Black History

Black Women Voters Seek to Shake up Midterms

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “The Trump presidency has repeatedly undermined the Affordable Care Act and other health programs that benefit the health of Black women. Black women will step up and vote for those who will work together with us to create health equity so that our families and communities can thrive…” — La’Tasha D. Mayes, founder and executive director of New Voices for Reproductive Justice […read more]

Featured

Massive Weekend Mobilizations Engage Infrequent Voters for Andrew Gillum, Bill Nelson and other Progressive Candidates Down the Ballot

WESTSIDE GAZETTE — Over 1,200 immigrant youth, families, and allies gathered in Miami to kick-off the one-month countdown to this year’s midterm election on October 6, 2018. By weekend’s end, the New Florida Majority, United We Dream Action, SEIU Florida, FLIC Votes and other members of the Win Justice coalition had knocked on 29,000 doors, called 16,000 people and texted 45,000 numbers in what was coordinated the largest single voter mobilization in the state of Florida this election cycle. […read more]

Mayor Andrew Gillum
Politics

Gillum Faces Formidable Odds But Can Still Be Elected Governor Of Florida

SOUTH FLORIDA TIMES — The day after the Aug. 28 primary elections in which Andrew Gillum became the first African American nominee for Florida governor, his Republican opponent, Ron DeSantis, stated, “The last thing we need to do is to monkey this up by trying to embrace a socialist agenda with huge tax increases and bankrupting the state.” […read more]