Ebola Life at Ground Zero

Ebola Life at Ground Zero

In this photo taken Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, a child grabs food from a woman in the Guinean village of Meliandou, some 400 miles (600 kms) south-east of Conakry, Guinea, believed to be Ebola’s ground zero. The official theory is that somehow the virus was transmitted from fruit bats to humans and spread through the region plagued with bad roads, dense population, and a problematic health care system along a porous borders that people used to cross regularly –before the outbreak—whether to join family or engage in trade. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

In this photo taken Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, a child grabs food from a woman in the Guinean village of Meliandou, some 400 miles (600 kms) south-east of Conakry, Guinea, believed to be Ebola’s ground zero. The official theory is that somehow the virus was transmitted from fruit bats to humans and spread through the region plagued with bad roads, dense population, and a problematic health care system along a porous borders that people used to cross regularly –before the outbreak—whether to join family or engage in trade. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

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