fbpx
Connect with us

Film

Samuel L. Jackson to join Chris Rock in reboot of horror classic ‘Saw’

ROLLINGOUT — The decorated actor will star in the anticipated Chris Rock-led reimagining of the classic horror film franchise.

Published

on

Samuel L. Jackson (Photo credit: A.R. Shaw for Steed Media)

By Jeandra Lebeauf

The Saw reboot adds Samuel L. Jackson to the cast, but who exactly will he portray?

The decorated actor will star in the anticipated Chris Rock-led reimagining of the classic horror film franchise. Rock will star in the film as a detective investigating heinous crimes while Jackson will portray his father. Jackson will join co-stars Max Minghella  (William Schenk), and Marisol Nichols (Capt. Angie Garza).

Sawan eight-movie franchise, centers around a man named John Kramer who places specifically chosen people in scenarios designed to test what they’re willing to do to live. During that time, victims are presented with a series of choices that place self-preservation over the lives of others, only to discover they’ve made the wrong choice in the end.

The first installment landed in theaters in October of 2004.

Rock reportedly approached Lionsgate Entertainment with an updated, reimagined version of the cult classic. Previous Saw producers Mark Burg and Oren Koules along with director Darren Lynn Bousman, who directed Saw 2  and Saw 3, will lead the new film. The most recent version of the film titled Jigsaw appeared in theaters in 2017. Actor Tobin Bell appeared in all eight versions of the franchise as the film’s antagonist.

Additionally, it’s been a busy 2019 for Jackson, with Avengers: Endgame, Captain Marvel, Shaft and Spider-man: Far From Home in theaters.

The Saw reboot is slated to hit theaters on Oct. 23, 2020,  just in time for Halloween.

This article originally appeared in Rollingout.com.

Film

At the Movies: Spider-Man: Far from Home; Yesterday; andThe Fall of the American Empire

NASHVILLE PRIDE — Families going to the cinema with members who don’t particularly care for superheroes and haven’t kept up with the amazing Marvel Cinematic Universe do have films that will tickle their fancy, though, and two are real gems: Yesterday and The Fall of the American Empire.

Published

on

Tom Holland is Peter Parker aka Spider-Man and Samuel L. Jackson is Nick Fury in Spider-Man Far from Home.

By Cass Teague

This first weekend of July, movie-goers have many choices. Chief among them, of course, is the Marvel Studios spectacular Spider-Man: Far from Home. Families going to the cinema with members who don’t particularly care for superheroes and haven’t kept up with the amazing Marvel Cinematic Universe do have films that will tickle their fancy, though, and two are real gems: Yesterday and The Fall of the American Empire.

First, though, Spider-Man: Far from Home is a rollicking adventure that will keep you thoroughly entertained at a high level of special effects (taking a dozen visual effects houses to render), with a few surprises along the way that will have you gasping, and leave you completely mind-blown at the end. Speaking of the end, you have to stay through the end of the credits, and I mean all the way through to the very end of the credits and they shut off the projector.

Samuel L. Jackson is awesome once again as Nick Fury, and along with Cobie Smulders’ Maria Hill, the S.H.I.E.L.D. duo intervenes when Peter Parker, our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man, embarks on a class science trip to Europe. All the teenager wants to do is profess his love for MJ, but ya know, superhero stuff gets in the way. Tom Holland and Zendaya are heartwarmingly loveable as the two star-crossed potential lovers, and their story highlights the quandary that plagues Marvel superheroes – how to balance saving the world with trying to have a normal life.

Without massive spoilers, and there is plenty to spoil here, trust me, as you will see, just buckle up for the ride and enjoy this continuation of the MCU that honors all that we went through in the Avengers Infinity War and Endgame films. I suggest that you may want to try 3D, IMAX 3D, or dare I say, the incredible 4DX that puts you in the action, for this one.

So, if superheroes aren’t your thing, and you tag along to the multiplex with a group or family, try a musical fantasy or a French-language crime thriller.

Yesterday is hilarious, laugh out loud British romantic comedy film directed by Danny Boyle and written by Richard Curtis. The film stars Himesh Patel as a musician who, after an accident, finds himself as the only person who remembers the Beatles, and becomes famous taking credit for writing and performing their songs. Lily James, Ed Sheeran, and Kate McKinnon also star.

The Fall of the American Empire is a Quebec crime thriller film starring Alexandre Landry, Maxim Roy, Yan England and Rémy Girard. It is about a man (Landry) who, after an armed robbery in Montreal, discovers two bags with millions of dollars cash and is on a journey after he takes them. Based on a real 2010 Old Montreal shooting, this film is at times shocking and suspenseful, as it takes you places you may not want to go, but brings you back in one piece. Be prepared to read the English subtitles throughout.

This article originally appeared in the Nashville Pride

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Will Packer Drama, ‘Ambitions’ Brings Star Power to OWN

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Entertainment juggernaut Will Packer, the man behind hit films like Girls Trip, Straight Outta Compton. Little, Stomp the Yard, Ride Along, “Ready to Love,” and “The Atlanta Child Murders” has brought “Ambitions,” a big drama starring Robin Givens, Essence Atkins, Kendrick Cross, Brian Bosworth and Brian White, to the small screen.

Published

on

“Ambitions,” a big drama starring Robin Givens, Essence Atkins, Kendrick Cross, Brian Bosworth and Brian White, on OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network.
“Ambitions,” a big drama starring Robin Givens, Essence Atkins, Kendrick Cross, Brian Bosworth and Brian White, on OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network.

By Nsenga K. Burton, Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Entertainment Editor

Entertainment juggernaut Will Packer, the man behind hit films like Girls Trip, Straight Outta Compton, Little, Stomp the Yard, Ride Along, “Ready to Love,” and “The Atlanta Child Murders” has brought “Ambitions,” a big drama starring Robin Givens, Essence Atkins, Kendrick Cross, Brian Bosworth and Brian White, to the small screen.

Robin Givens plays the role of Stephanie Lancaster, a sophisticated lawyer hailing from a long line of distinguished attorneys. Stephanie desperately wants to be in charge of her family’s prestigious law firm and will stop at nothing to get it. Brian White is ‘Evan Lancaster,’ the Mayor of Atlanta, who is married to attorney Stephanie Carlisle (Robin Givens). Evan’s dream is to be the first African-American governor of Georgia and there’s no line he won’t cross to get there.

Kendrick Cross stars as ‘Titus Hughes,’ a passionate attorney and dedicated husband to Amara (Essence Atkins). Titus has accepted the challenge of being in-house counsel for a big pharma company run by Hunter Purifoy (Brian Bosworth) to fight a class action suit brought by the powerful Carlisle family.

Brely Evans stars as ‘Rondell Lancaster,’ the sister of Atlanta Mayor Evan Lancaster and manager of the Thelma’s Place restaurant. As the new face of an anti-gentrification campaign, she never thought she’d become a crusader for the people, but it’s a badge she wears with pride – and nobody is removing it.

Erica Page plays the role of ‘Bella (Tru) Trujillo,’ Atlanta’s newest and trendiest fashion designer. She’s the exclusive dress designer for First Lady Stephanie Lancaster, but has set her sights much higher. 

Essence Atkins plays the role of ‘Amara Hughes,’ a lawyer in the U.S. Attorney’s Office who has newly arrived in Atlanta with her husband, Titus (Kendrick Cross). Originally from Texas, she is quickly gaining attention from the U.S. Attorney’s Office as a diligent investigator and prosecutor.

In addition, Brian Bosworth (“What Men Want”), Matt Cedeño (“Power”), Deena Dill (“Conrad & Michelle”), Gino Anthony Pesi (“Shades of Blue”) and Kayla Smith (“Star”) will appear in recurring roles.

Created by executive producer/writer Jamey Giddens “AMBITIONS” is produced for OWN by Will Packer Media in association with Lionsgate and Lionsgate-owned distributor Debmar-Mercury.

Will Packer is executive producer. Kevin Arkadie is executive producer/showrunner. Creator/writer Jamey Giddens and Will Packer Media’s Sheila Ducksworth also serve as executive producers.

Benny Boom directed and served as a producer of the pilot episode.

Connect with the series on social media via: @AmbitionsOWN (Instagram & Twitter)

Check local listings for channel information.

This post was curated by Nsenga K Burton, Ph.D., founder & editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire. An expert in intersectionality and media industries, Dr. Burton is also a professor of film and television at Emory University and co-editor of the book, Black Women’s Mental Health: Balancing Strength and Vulnerability. Follow her on Twitter @Ntellectual or @TheBurtonWire

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Film, fellowship puts Memphian Jamey Hatley on course for the big screen

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Hatley is the recipient of the inaugural Indie Memphis Black Filmmaker Fellowship in Screenwriting. Funded by Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight” and “If Beale Street Could Talk”), the two-month fellowship comes with a $7,500 unrestricted cash grant to help Hatley develop her screenplay, “The Eureka Hotel.”

Published

on

Jamey Hatley (Photo: Demarcus Bowser)
Jamey Hatley (Photo: Demarcus Bowser)

By Karanja A. Ajanaku, New Tri-State Defender
kajanaku@tsdmemphis.com

Jamey Hatley is from Walker Homes and while debates still rage over whether that’s in Whitehaven or Westwood, there is no question that Hatley’s writing career is on an upward trajectory.

Hatley is the recipient of the inaugural Indie Memphis Black Filmmaker Fellowship in Screenwriting. Funded by Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight” and “If Beale Street Could Talk”), the two-month fellowship comes with a $7,500 unrestricted cash grant to help Hatley develop her screenplay, “The Eureka Hotel.”

Jenkins also handpicked Raven Jackson, another native of Tennessee, as the winner of the Indie Memphis national Black Filmmaker Residency for Screenwriting. The two-month residency, including travel and housing, affords Jackson, a thesis student in New York University’s Graduate Film program, $7,500. Her feature film product is “all dirt roads taste of salt.”

“As an artist, I’ve always admired Memphis and what it’s meant to black artistry across many forms and genres,” said Jenkins. “To partner with Indie Memphis in supporting Jamey Hatley and Raven Jackson in taking the next steps in their quest to creatively engage and contribute to the diaspora is an honor most high.

“In their work, I find resounding proof that Memphis both raises talent from within (Hatley, a native Memphian) and inspires it from abroad (Jackson).”

A Whitehaven High School alum, Hatley had definite plans – attend the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and become a corporate executive – the day she walked off the graduation stage.

What happened? So many things, she said, including an internship that contributed to her rethinking her plans. Later, she got a journalism degree from the University of Memphis and at one point got mixed up in the music industry via a connection.

“…(W)ords and books were so important to me that I could not imagine myself being a writer. I tiptoed up to it,” she said. “I was doing everything to run away from these stories, but I was still scribbling. The stories ended up catching up with me.”

Screenwriting came into the picture by email and out of the blue last September.

“At that time, I had no job. My literal organization had gotten defunded, it had fallen apart. It was like, ‘Oh, this fancy director considers you an ideal collaborator. Would you do it?’ I’m like, ‘I like to eat, I like to pay my rent, so OK.’”

That project, which is for a major network, still is in development. The experience opened the door to the Writer’s Guild and primed her for the Indie Memphis Black Filmmaker Fellowship in Screenwriting opportunity.

“I think one of my superpowers is knowing, ‘Oh, here’s your door. Are you going to walk through it?’ If it’s a door and I feel like it’s mine, then I’m going to run through it and I’ll figure it out on the other side.”

That the fellowship was being funded by Jenkins was a huge attraction. She’d met him at an event in New Orleans (where she was living at the time) and had summoned the resolve to share with him her first – and then recently published in the Oxford American – short story.

Content to “just watch Barry’s beautiful movies for the rest of my life,” she learned on Twitter that she had won the fellowship and the opportunity to learn more directly from him.

“I still can’t believe it,” she said.

Hatley entered a treatment into the fellowship, eager for the resources and support to create a finished version of her screenplay, “The Eureka Hotel.”

The Eureka Hotel was a real place in Memphis. Hatley became aware of it while researching for her novel, learning that it had operated out of a Victorian-styled home that she had stared at so many times while visiting a friend’s Downtown Memphis art gallery.

“The Eureka Hotel,” Hatley says, is “a journey story because the Eureka was a colored hotel. … Their tagline was ‘Always open.’”

A short film based on the screenplay now is in post-production.

“It’s beautiful. Absolutely beautiful,” says Hatley, who must deliver a script for a feature-length film to Jenkins.

She also has “a few things else that are secret that are working in the background that happen to be scripts.

“But I’m also going to finish my novel, because I’m still a novelist….”

The novel is about Memphis.

“Everything I write is about Memphis, and it’s about Walker Homes. It’s called the ‘Dream Singers.’ It takes place in the wake of the King assassination, and there is a woman … I call her a dream singer. …She has babies, twins. One is born at the moment that King is assassinated. One is born at the moment that he dies, and all the hopes and dreams of this community, that’s based on Walker Homes, reside in these babies. In three months, four months, later in July, one of the babies passes away. That stymies the community. …

“I feel like Memphis feels a debt about King dying here that we’ve never fully acknowledged. …To me, dreams are debt. Anybody’s dream, somebody else pays for it. …It’s really exploring who gets the dream and who pays the price for that.”

America, she says, has never been honest with itself, regarding the root-level issues that existed before Dr. King – issues that brought him to Memphis and ultimately led to his assassination.

“I think art gives us an opportunity to at least explore being honest in a way that’s not comfortable, but more successful.”

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

FILM REVIEW: The Farewell

NNPA NEWSWIRE — When you walk out of the theater you may feel like you just left a family meal or a close friend’s house. That familial reaction is the result of Wang’s welcoming storytelling and an ensemble cast that makes you feel at home as you experience a sweet and sour drama, which tends to be more sweet.

Published

on

The cast of The Farewell

By Dwight Brown, NNPA Newswire Film Critic

That thing called life. Everyone goes through it, somehow putting a greater focus on the beginning and not the end. Who’s more adorable? Babies or elders? Yea, right.

The Farwell dares to venture to the last chapter of our existence as it examines how an Asian family handles the finish-line process. It does so with a warm-hearted and uplifting spirit that is quite affecting.

Writer/director Lulu Wang dug into her own experiences to develop the script’s premise, storyline and characters, basing her 98-minute anecdote on an incident that happened to her.

Wang’s alter-ego is Billi (Awkwafina, Crazy Rich Asians), a Chinese-born, U.S.-raised twentysomething who is stunned to learn that her grandma, Nai Nai (Zhao Shuzhen), has been diagnosed with a terminal disease and given a short time to live.

Billi is even more shocked when her dad Haiyan (Tzi Ma, The Quiet American, Rush Hour) and mom Jian (Diana Lin) advise her that the family will not tell the matriarch her diagnosis. Instead, they will gather around her in Changchun, China, their hometown, under the pretense of celebrating a wedding.

For Billi, who is brash, the impulse to reach out to Nai Nai and console her is almost uncontrollable. It’s so strong, her parents don’t want her to travel to China, in fear that she’ll spill the beans. They leave for their motherland, without her. Billi, poor as a church mouse, finds a way (credit cards) to follow them there. In China, her parents and extended family are on pins and needles wondering if their cover will be blown.

Bravely Lulu Wang takes on a dreary subject, but adds an inventive touch of magic, humor and artistry to her narrative. Her Nai Nai character is a magnet of strength. Scenes with her practicing Tai chi and teaching it to Billi are priceless.

The tension between Billi and her parents over a tradition of holding back bad news seems authentic. In America, patients hear about the grim reaper all the time. In China, or at least in this family, the focus is on preserving a quality of life for as long as possible. And if that means sheltering the patient from a death sentence with a group charade, so be it.

Many films start or end with a screenshot that says, ‘Based on a true story.” The Farewell begins with the notation, “Based on an actual lie.” So, from the git-go, audiences know that this will not be an ordinary family drama. And it isn’t.

Wang is very deft at creating a vibrant family vibe, with rivalries, past history, love and conflict all rolled into one. Her efforts are complemented by an ensemble cast that knows their roles and plays them out accordingly. Tzi Ma as dad is the stodgy patriarch. Diana Lin and Ma make the perfect couple, who have one foot planted firmly in the Western world, and the other in their homeland and its culture.

Awkwafina as Billi, is their polar opposite. She’s as American as apple pie and an Apple Computer. She struggles to stay modern, yet respect her culture, traditions and family, too. Her dilemma will resonate with her generation or the offspring of immigrants. Emotional scenes between the three lead actors run quite deep, giving Awkwafina a chance to show her solid dramatic acting chops.

Wang is an artist. It’s evident in the way she frames scenes like family photo portraits, and also in the excellent choices she makes with her tech crew: The music, from the original score (Alex Weston) to the eclectic playlist (musical supervisors Susan Jacobs and Dylan Neely), is as impeccable as it is quirky. The clothes looked lived in (Athena Wang, costume designer). The footage’s colors and tones look great and the cast is well-lit and photographed (Anna Franquesca Solano, D.P.). Sets, from banquet halls to homes and apartments (Yong Ok Lee, production designer) look genuine, and you often question whether you’re watching a movie or real life.

If there is one imperfection, it’s the editing choices. Some scenes, especially the dinners, run on too long, way after the dramatic point has been made (Matt Friedman and Michael Taylor, editor).

When you walk out of the theater you may feel like you just left a family meal or a close friend’s house. That familial reaction is the result of Wang’s welcoming storytelling and an ensemble cast that makes you feel at home as you experience a sweet and sour drama, which tends to be more sweet.

Visit NNPA Newswire Film Critic Dwight Brown at DwightBrownInk.comand BlackPressUSA.com.

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

IN MEMORIAM: Cameron Boyce Remembered

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The world is mourning the loss of Disney star Cameron Boyce who passed away Saturday due to an ongoing medical condition. Boyce, 20, who starred in Disney’s Descendants franchise, was found unresponsive at his home and could not be revived by paramedics. The proud grandchild showcased his grandmother who integrated schools in Clinton, Mississippi in 1956, one year before the famed Little Rock 9and just two years after the landmark Brown vs. The Board of Education of Topeka, KSdecision desegregating schools in America.

Published

on

Boyce grew up in front of the camera making his big screen debut in the 2009 horror film Mirrors. He rose to fame as the character of Luke Ross on Disney’s tv show “Jessie.”

By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Contributor

The world is mourning the loss of Disneystar Cameron Boyce who passed away Saturday due to an ongoing medical condition. Boyce, 20, who starred in Disney’s Descendants franchise, was found unresponsive at his home and could not be revived by paramedics.

Boyce grew up in front of the camera making his big screen debut in the 2009 horror film Mirrors. He rose to fame as the character of Luke Ross on Disney’s tv show “Jessie.” His “Jessie” co-star Skai Jackson remembered him on Twitter. She wrote:

“I don’t even know where to start… I am at a loss for words. I never thought in a million years I would be writing this. Cam, you were one of a kind. My heart will be forever broken. I am so happy that I got to spend almost every day with you on set, you gave the best hugs. I wish I would have hugged you tighter when I saw you a couple of months ago. Thank you so much for being the big brother I never had… I am so distraught, and I cannot stop crying! I love you so much… fly high. Gods best Angel.”

While Boyce is widely known for his work on television, he also worked alongside Adam Sandler in Grown Ups 1and Grown Ups 2. The usually upbeat actor tweeted his despair over the loss of Boyce who was beloved in the entertainment world. Sandler tweeted, “Too young. Too sweet. Too funny. Just the nicest, most talented, and most decent kid around,” Sandler wrote on Twitter. “Loved that kid. Cared so much about his family. Cared so much about the world. Thank you, Cameron, for all you gave to us. So much more was on the way. All our hearts are broken. Thinking of your amazing family and sending our deepest condolences.”

Boyce’s family was featured in his 2016 Black History Month tribute to his grandmother Jo Ann Boyce who was part of the Clinton 12. As part of Disney XD’s short film series Be Inspired. The proud grandchild showcased his grandmother who integrated schools in Clinton, Mississippi in 1956, one year before the famed Little Rock 9and just two years after the landmark Brown vs. The Board of Education of Topeka, KSdecision desegregating schools in America.

In the short film, Cameron, his sister and their parents travel to the Green McAdoo Cultural Center which features sculptures of his grandmother and the other 11 students who changed history in the United States. Cameron affectionately refers to her as his “Nana” throughout the short film and proclaims that she is his hero.

Boyce, who starred as Conor in Disney’s“Gamers Guide to Pretty Much Everything” for two seasons, had been working on a number of projects including the film Paradise Cityand HBO’s “Mrs. Fletcher,” when he died. Boyce’s family says he died of a seizure due to an ongoing, undisclosed medical condition.

Walt Disneychairman and CEO Bob Iger offered condolences to the Boyce family.

“The Walt Disney Company mourns the loss of Cameron Boyce who was a friend to so many of us, and filled with so much talent, heart and life, and far too young to die,” Iger wrote. “Our prayers go out to his family and his friends.”

Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D. is culture and entertainment editor for NNPA/Black Press USA. She is also founder & editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire, an award-winning news blog covering the African Diaspora. Follow her on Twitter @Ntellectual.

Continue Reading

Charleston Chronicle

P&G Addresses Racial Bias With New Film “The Look”

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Continuing the conversation from its Emmy Award-winning film “The Talk,” Procter & Gamble this week released a new film designed to spark reflection and conversation on racial bias and inequality. Titled “The Look,” the film highlights bias as experienced by many Black men in America and is available beginning today together with educational resources at www.talkaboutbias.com.

Published

on

“The Look” follows a Black man throughout his day as he encounters a variety of ‘looks’ that symbolize a barrier to acceptance. In the film, the windows of a passing car are raised after his son waves to a young girl in the back seat. (Photo: Business Wire)
By The Charleston Chronicle

Continuing the conversation from its Emmy Award-winning film “The Talk,” Procter & Gamble this week released a new film designed to spark reflection and conversation on racial bias and inequality. Titled “The Look,” the film highlights bias as experienced by many Black men in America and is available beginning today together with educational resources at www.talkaboutbias.com.

“We want to live in a world that is equal and inclusive – in race, gender, ethnicity, sexual identity, ability, religion and age – but the reality is, it’s not fully equal or inclusive and one of the core reasons is bias,” said Marc Pritchard, Chief Brand Officer, and Procter & Gamble. “Empathy can be a particularly effective antidote to bias, and we created ‘The Look’ to change perspectives, prompt personal introspection, and bring people together for a conversation to ultimately change hearts and minds.”

“The Look” follows a Black man throughout his day as he encounters a variety of ‘looks’ that symbolize a barrier to acceptance. In the film, the windows of a passing car are raised after his son waves to a young girl in the back seat, occupants of an elevator seem to shut him out as he approaches and workers in a department store watch him with suspicion as he shops. For each scene, historical records and contemporary stories are provided at www.talkaboutbias.com to spark discussion and understanding on how these small ‘looks’, whether intentional or not, can have a potentially bigger impact. The film ends with the line ‘Let’s talk about the look so we can see beyond it.”

“We believe we have a responsibility to use our voice in advertising as a force for good by addressing issues like bias. As it has already done for so many who have seen ‘The Look’, we hope this film leads to constructive conversation, understanding and positive action,” Pritchard added.

The film and website were produced in collaboration with SATURDAY MORNING, a creative collective founded by executives in the advertising industry who came together to create ideas that bring awareness to and shift perceptions on racial bias and injustice.

“The story of ‘The Look’ is based in the real-world experience of thousands of Black men across the country who experience bias in different ways, big and small, every day. This film is an opportunity for the world to see – and feel – what it’s like to walk in their shoes,” said Kwame Taylor-Hayford, a co-founder of SATURDAY MORNING. “Partnering with companies like P&G on thought-provoking and authentic work like ‘The Look’ will lead to deeper and richer conversation that will inspire change.”

“Bias is part of the human condition, something we all have and something we all experience. It is most frequently unconscious, formed by generations of social norms. ‘The Look’ is designed to constructively challenge people to look beyond what they think they see,” said Damon Jones, Vice President, Global Communications and Advocacy, Procter & Gamble. “Beyond highlighting bias, this film also celebrates the strength, humanity and resilience of Black men who are thriving amidst many obstacles. It is one part of a comprehensive effort that will help address individual and institutionalized bias to create meaningful change.”

Over the past year, P&G partnered with BET Networks on a comprehensive study of Black men, called Black Men Revealed, highlighting compelling data on prevailing narratives in media and entertainment, including those on parental involvement, relationship status and economic pursuits. Insights from this study are being shared with groups across the country to enable more accurate, positive portrayals of Black men in film, television and news – all key factors in addressing the underlying bias in society.

The film premiered last week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in France and BET Networks’ inaugural social impact conference, META Convened by BET Networks in Los Angeles.

“The Look” was shot by a deliberately diverse leadership-duo, Director Anthony Mandler of Stink Films with Malik Sayeed as Director of Photography, and is launching as part of an integrated campaign at www.talkaboutbias.com. It will be followed by a series of nationwide community conversations, individual and classroom educational resources and reading guides, informative and inspirational podcasts, virtual reality extensions and ongoing digital and social media activities through the end of 2019. This program is designed to go beyond simple awareness and equip and enable individuals and communities with tools to create lasting, substantive change.

Source: PR Newswire

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Latest News

%d bloggers like this: