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Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

House passes renter protection bill

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — The Minnesota House of Representatives passed a bipartisan bill to increase lease transparency and protections for renters.

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Rep. Mohamud Noor (Photo by: Stephenetta (isis) Harmon | MSR News Online)

By MSR Online

The Minnesota House of Representatives passed a bipartisan bill to increase lease transparency and protections for renters.

“Students, low-income individuals, and immigrants are disproportionately impacted by housing policies that are designed to favor landlords over renters,” said Rep. Mohamud Noor (DFL – Minneapolis), who authored the bill. “Stable housing is fundamental to living a productive, affordable life. This consumer protection measure will bring much-needed transparency to the housing market.”

The bill would require landlords to disclose the unit being rented; require the lease start and end dates be put on the first page of a lease; prevent a tenant from getting charged a full month’s rent when they are required to move out before the month has ended; and prohibit landlords from providing notice to quit the premises or increase rent in a time period that is less than what the lease allows the tenant to provide notice of an intention to quit the premises.

The bill is now set for a Senate hearing.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

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Books

A champion of the people: Josie Johnson still finds hope in the struggle

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Josie Johnson. The term “living legend” might well understate her stature in the community. She is a beloved lady with a warm hearted smile and serious political clout who has made history, indeed helped shaped it, as chronicled in her book Hope in the Struggle: A Memoir (University of Minnesota Press).

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Submitted photo (l-r) Carolyn Holbrook, Josie Johnson and Arleta Little
By MSR News Online

Josie Johnson. The term “living legend” might well understate her stature in the community. She is a beloved lady with a warm hearted smile and serious political clout who has made history, indeed helped shaped it, as chronicled in her book Hope in the StruggleA Memoir (University of Minnesota Press).

On the dust cover of the memoir, Walter Mondale attests that Johnson “has always been a champion of fairness and decency, and this book shows us that while there is still work to be done, with her help, there will always be hope.”

Her friend and comrade Mahmoud El- Kati, Twin Cities historian, scholar and community griot, told Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder that Hope in the Struggle “is timely and it’s important. Many people are going to find it very, very useful because of the time and context she addresses.”

Just a partial listing of Johnson’s pedigree as a person of the people notes that she has remained active in civil rights since a teenager when she and her father canvassed to gather signatures on an anti-poll tax petition.

In the early 1960s, Johnson professionally lobbied for fair housing and equal opportunity employment. A member of the Minneapolis Urban League, she served as acting director between 1967 and 1968, after which she became a legislative and community liaison as a mayoral aide in Minneapolis during a time of turbulent racial unrest that had swept America. She co-chaired Minnesota’s delegation to the momentous 1971 March on Washington.

She is also a recipient of the Committed to the Vision Award from the Minneapolis Department of Civil Rights, and the University of Minnesota established the Josie Robinson Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award in her honor.

In her living room, you can get a glimpse of how her life has spanned African American progress. On a wall there are artifacts from the Jim Crow era — signs reading, “Colored seated in rear” and “We serve colored carry out only.” And not far from an end table sits a framed photo of Josie Johnson and Michelle Obama together, radiantly smiling.

On June 27, Johnson enjoyed a book signing at UROC in North Minneapolis. “I was very happy to have an opportunity to [be] with our community,” she said, “and talk about what my team [Carolyn Holbrook and Arleta Little with whom she crafted the memoir] was trying to do in the book. That was the purpose.”

Asked why, when, and how she came by her lifelong commitment to making a difference, Johnson said, “I grew up in an environment where it made a difference. My dad wanted to be a lawyer, but there were no schools for Black graduate students.

“So, he became employed by the Southern Pacific Railroad and was a dining car waiter. He organized [fellow] waiters. Mother got involved in programs educating Black children, and I grew up with a community that believed in us as a people being engaged in the well-being of all.”

That principle, a strong theme in Hope in the Struggle, is an abiding aspect of what she terms the “transition of values to future generations.” In the chapter “Making Our Way,” Johnson attests, “North Minneapolis was a close-knit community before the problems of the ’60s broke out. Just like the families of my childhood in Houston, North Side families knew and looked out for one another.

“Neighbors knew the names of the children, whether they lived in the projects or in modest or middle-to-upper-class homes.” She goes on to note, “Black-owned barber shops and beauty salons, restaurants, bars and cafes, dry cleaners, grocery stores, and clothing stores thrived. The Givens Ice Cream Bar was also a mainstay in the community, owned by Archie Givens Sr. and his wife Phebe. Archie and Phebe grew up in North Minneapolis and remained there with their children while he grew his career as a real estate developer building new homes for Black families.”

Speaking with MSR, she added, “Our children need that, now. The sense of living in a close-knit community…talking to our kids about their history and who they are. Give them a sense of pride.”

She added, “The society has created an environment now [that has] made Black adults afraid of their own. They don’t stop them in the street anymore to correct them when they’re doing something to misbehave. We have fallen into that trap.”

Johnson continued, “I had an experience that was so rewarding. I was on a department store escalator one time.  Three young Black ladies, girls, were talking in [foul] language. Not what this old lady wanted to hear. I said, ‘Young ladies, you are too beautiful to talk like that.’ They turned around, covered their mouths and apologized. Wasn’t that something? I wasn’t afraid of our children.”

Johnson is troubled by the state of things not only for those children but the nation, period, since Barack Obama left office. In the Hope in the Struggle epilogue, she observes that today’s White House is far from a friend of social progress; in fact, it stands counter thereto.

“Since his election, Donald Trump has defined his presidency in his own way. He has borrowed strategies from past presidents — for example, Nixon and Reagan — that fit his definition of his presidency. And in so doing, he has created a world of confusion.”

Asked to expound on that point, she said, “Trump came in and said it was alright to be racist.  It’s alright to be sexist and treat women the way he did. Alright to make fun of people that are handicapped, have various disabilities.

“And America told him he was right. It elected him President of the United States. They still allow him to get away with that. That’s the harm he’s done to America. I wonder what that says to children still trying to develop a sense of right and wrong.”

To order purchase your copy of Hope in the Struggle: A Memoir, go to bit.ly/JosieJohnsonHope.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

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Commentary

COMMENTARY: Johnson-Patterson played as well as she coached

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Faith Johnson-Patterson is well known in Minnesota high school basketball lore. After eight state titles and 14 tournament appearances as the head girls’ coach at Minneapolis North (state championships in 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005) and DeLaSalle (state championships in 2011, 2012, 2013), she has established herself among the state’s elite.

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Faith Johnson-Patterson (Photo courtesy of Eden Prairie)
By Dr. Mitchell Palmer McDonald

Faith Johnson-Patterson is well known in Minnesota high school basketball lore. After eight state titles and 14 tournament appearances as the head girls’ coach at Minneapolis North (state championships in 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005) and DeLaSalle (state championships in 2011, 2012, 2013), she has established herself among the state’s elite.

Twenty-nine years ago, I saw the Hall of Fame coach in a different light.

In May 1980, my father invited me — a ninth-grader at the time — to attend a high school all-star game at the old Met Center in Bloomington featuring teams representing Minnesota and Indiana.

I was very excited because my basketball heroes at the time — Ricky Suggs (St. Paul Central) and David Gilreath (Marshall University High) — were going to be playing against the best high school players the state of Indiana had to offer.

My pops, the late Kwame McDonald, had other ideas. I should have known, because we were leaving for the game three hours before tip-off.

“There’s a girls’ game before the boys’,” he said with urgency. “I’ve got to see Faith.”

At the time, I wasn’t that excited about seeing the girls play. The priority for me was to watch the boys represent. I also remember saying to myself, “Faith who?”

The answer to that question was fully answered in the next hour and a half.

We looked on as Marshall-University High senior guard Faith Johnson — displaying quickness, leadership and one of the purest jump shots I’ve ever witnessed scored nine of her 15 points in the second period to help the Minnesota all-stars defeat the Indiana all-stars 71-65.

That game was my introduction to Faith Johnson the player. Many don’t realize the impact she had as a player during a time when girls’ basketball was in its infancy.

She played in the first two girls’ state basketball tournaments during her eighth- and ninth-grade seasons, and though she went on to have an outstanding prep career, she was not an all-state selection as a senior.

Despite the snub, she accepted a scholarship offer to play at the University of Wisconsin, scoring 1,120 points from 1980-1985.

Many remember Johnson-Patterson as one the state’s greatest coaches. Some remember her as an outstanding high school player.

Thanks to my father, I will always remember her as both.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

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Economy

Racial disparities make it harder to ‘die well’

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN – RECORDER — African Americans experience an earlier onset and greater risk of what may be referred to as lifestyle-related diseases — cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes. More than 40 percent of African Americans over the age of 20 are diagnosed with high blood pressure, compared to 32 percent of all Americans.

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Grave (Photo by: rawpixel.com | pexels.com)
By Jason Ashe and Danielle L. Beatty Moody

The world got an idea recently from 92-year-old Buddhist monk and peace activist Thich Nhat Hanh, who popularized mindfulness and meditation in the U.S. The monk returned to his home in Vietnam to pass his remaining years. Many admired his desire to live his remaining time in peace and dignity.

Researchers from the University of California-San Diego recently did a literature search to understand what Americans might consider to be a “good death” or “successful dying.” As can be expected, their findings varied. People’s views were determined by their religious, social and cultural norms and influences.

The researchers urged healthcare providers, caregivers and the lay community to have open dialogues about preferences for the dying process.

As scholars who study social health and human services psychology, we found something missing in these conversations — how race impacts life span. It’s important to recognize that not everyone has an equal chance at “dying well.”

Black population and ill health

Take the disease burden of the African American population.

African Americans experience an earlier onset and greater risk of what may be referred to as lifestyle-related diseases — cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes. More than 40 percent of African Americans over the age of 20 are diagnosed with high blood pressure, compared to 32 percent of all Americans.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that the likelihood of experiencing a first stroke is nearly twice as high for African Americans compared with Whites. African Americans are more than two times more likely to experience a stroke before the age of 55. At age 45, the mortality rate from stroke is three times higher for Blacks compared to Whites.

This disease burden consequently leads to their higher mortality rates and overall shorter life expectancy for Blacks compared to Whites.

And while the life expectancy gap differs by only a few years, 75.3 for Blacks and 78.9 for Whites as of 2016, research suggests that African Americans suffer more sickness. This is due in part to the increased prevalence of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes in this population.

Genetics, biological factors and lifestyle behaviors, such as diet and smoking, help explain a portion of these differences. However, researchers are still learning how race-related social experiences and physical environments affect health, illness and mortality.

Access to health care

One factor is that African Americans have historically underutilized preventive medicine and healthcare services. They also delay seeking routine, necessary health care — or may not follow medical advice.

One study found that during an average month, 35 percent fewer Blacks visited a physician’s office, and 27 percent fewer visited an outpatient clinic compared with Whites. “The only time I go to the doctor is when something is really hurting. But otherwise, I don’t even know my doctor’s name,” said a young African American male during a research study in Chicago.

There are reasons for this mistrust. Researchers who study medical mistrust argue that high-profile cases of medical experiments are still playing a role in how African Americans view healthcare systems and providers.

In the past, physicians have intentionally done harm against people of color. A well-known case is the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis” in African American men, which lasted from 1932 to 1972.

In this clinical study, 399 African American men who had already contracted syphilis were told that they were receiving free health care from the government. In fact, doctors, knowing their critical condition, were awaiting their deaths to subsequently conduct autopsies and study the disease’s progression.

Even though penicillin had been proven to treat syphilis by 1947, these men were denied the treatment.

Why discrimination matters for health

Other studies suggest that regardless of their knowledge of past medical abuse, many African Americans have low levels of trust in medical establishments.

“Doctors, like all other people, are subject to prejudice and discrimination,” writes Damon Tweedy, author of Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine. “While bias can be a problem in any profession, in medicine, the stakes are much higher.”

Unfortunately, these fears are underscored by empirical evidence that African Americans are less likely to receive pain medication management, higher quality care, or survive surgical procedures.

In addition, a growing body of literature has established that experiences of discrimination are extremely harmful to physical and mental health, particularly among African Americans. This research adds to the body of evidence that experiences of discrimination harm people’s health and may contribute to the increased rates of premature decline and death among Blacks.

What does it take to SOTdie well?

As African American scholars, we argue the “art of dying well” may be a distant and romantic notion for the African American community. African Americans are also exposed to earlier and more frequent deaths of close loved ones, immediate family members and friends.

Their increased “vulnerability to untimely deaths,” writes Duke University scholar Karla Holloway, shows African Americans’ lack of access to equitable and fair paths in life.

Before defining “a good death,” American society must first begin to fundamentally address how to promote quality living and longevity across all racial groups.

Story republished with permission from The Conversation.

Jason Ashe is a doctoral student in human services psychology at the University of Maryland. Danielle L. Beatty Moody is an assistant professor of behavioral medicine at the University of Maryland.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

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#NNPA BlackPress

Serena Williams gets first Wheaties box cover, hopes to inspire next generation

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion”

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Wheaties Box Cover with Serena Williams (Photo by: General Mills)

By Paige Elliot

The tennis champ follows in the footsteps of Althea Gibson

Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion

For Williams, the achievement fulfills a long-held goal. “I have dreamt of this since I was a young woman and it’s an honor to join the ranks of some of America’s most decorated athletes,” Williams said in a press release.

One of those decorated athletes includes tennis great Althea Gibson, who became the first Black female tennis player to grace Wheaties cover in 2001.

On Instagram, Williams made sure her 11.1M followers knew the score. “In 2001, Wheaties paid homage to a true champion and an icon by putting her on the cover of a Wheaties Box. Althea Gibson was the FIRST Black Woman tennis player to be on the box. Today, I am honored to be the second.”

Gibson and Williams are among just a handful of Black women to covet a “Breakfast of Champions” cover. Gymnast Dominique Dawes received hers in 1996 and Olympian Jackie Joyner-Kersee in 2004.

“Serena exemplifies all of the personal attributes that Wheaties looks for when choosing who its next champion will be,” stated Wheaties Marketing Manager Tiffani Daniels in a press release. “On the court, she has been named the women’s most valuable player seven times, while off the court she uses her voice to inspire and spark change to make the world a better place.”

Williams, widely considered one of the greatest athletes of all time, is currently competing at Wimbledon in both women’s singles and mixed doubles with Andy Murray. She’s on a quest for a 24th Grand Slam singles title. She’s won 14 Grand Slam doubles titles and four Olympic gold medals.

The limited-edition Wheaties box featuring Williams will be on the shelves for the month of July. “I hope my image on this iconic orange box will inspire the next generation of girls and athletes to dream big,” said Williams.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

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Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Buying a home in a seller’s market

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — For decades, buying a home wasn’t just a goal, it was an expectation — the foundation of the American Dream. And, it was relatively easy to achieve. According to a recent study by real-estate firm Unison, in 1975 the average person could save up enough for a 20-percent down payment in nine years.

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Photo by: Pixabay | Pexels.com
By Solomon Gustavo

For decades, buying a home wasn’t just a goal, it was an expectation — the foundation of the American Dream. And, it was relatively easy to achieve. According to a recent study by real-estate firm Unison, in 1975 the average person could save up enough for a 20-percent down payment in nine years.

While owning a house remains the single best way of accumulating wealth, it seems much further out of reach today. In the current market, the Unison study reports it would take 14 years to save that 20 percent down payment. In the tougher Minneapolis housing market, it would take 17 years.

It’s even worse for African Americans. In the last 20 years, the homeownership gap between Blacks and Whites has held strong at 30 percent.

Understanding the housing market, particularly since the 2008 crash, has become increasingly intimidating. Finding resources, tips and programs has grown complicated and overwhelmingly cumbersome to the novice or first-time buyer.

That’s where the Minnesota Homeownership Center (MHC) comes in. “It’s not that hard,” said Bill Gray, MHC stakeholder relations director.

“Is the process confusing? Yeah, the process is crazy town. [But] with somebody to walk you through it for free, you can pull it off,” said Gray.

MHC was created to show people with low incomes or those sidelined from homeownership by discrimination that buying a home is achievable, as well as both fiscally practical and advantageous.

For 25 years, the nonprofit has helped people buy homes around the state with such services as an intensive eight-hour homebuyer’s course, along with referrals to advisors and program specialists — all for free.

Trading myths for welcome mats

The organization provides “education and preparation from unbiased sources,” said Gray. “This isn’t education being given by a bank.” MHC works to help prospective buyers see through barriers that may prevent them from moving forward.

“Don’t fall for the myths that cause many people to believe ownership is not for them,” said MHS executive director Julie Gugin. “There’s a wide variety of community-based supports for those ready to start the homeownership journey.”

The biggest misconception is that buyers still need to come up with a 20 percent down payment to buy their home. “Who has $50,000 laying around?” asked Gray.

Instead, the MHC course equips participants with knowledge and resources necessary for successful homeownership. This ranges from how calculating how much house one can afford, learning to read and comprehend real estate-related information, and learning to interpret a house inspector’s evaluation.

Learning such vital information can do wonders in the home-buying process, said prospective homebuyer and MHC class participant Stacie Redmond. The 34-year-old sales associate and mother of three began her housing search shortly after her twins were born, which crowded their two-bedroom South Minneapolis apartment.

Getting ready

Redmond followed tips from the course, like building a $3,000 rainy-day fund to prepare for something like the hot water heater or other large appliance needing to be repaired or replaced — even before making an offer on a home.

Through the course, she was also referred to an MHC partner housing advisor who pulled Redmond’s credit report and identified tips for cleaning it up. The advisor then introduced her to a loan officer who informed her of a network of Minneapolis homebuyer programs.

“Everyone’s coming from a different place,” said Mary Kaluza, a homeownership advisor with MHC partner Lutheran Social Services.

Kaluza said advisors begin finding out what steps a prospective homebuyer has taken so far, what their goals are, what their finances look like, and what resources and programs are available to them.

After getting her finances in order, Redmond was ready to buy a house. But that was only half the battle; then came entering the market. She’s been on the hunt for nearly a year, seeing over 50 homes.

Redmond said she feels it’s actually harder to finally land a home than it is to get in a position buy one. In her experience, sellers see multiple offers almost instantly after putting the house on the market. Her latest lesson, she explained, is not just being in financial position but also being ready to make a move.

But she is hopeful in her search: “The market is switching from a seller’s to a buyer’s market,” said Redmond.

Kaluza said the largest misconception people have coming into homeownership is just how long it takes to become “mortgage ready.” Echoing Redmond, that’s often the easier part.

“Right now, housing prices are so high that it’s really tough for people,” said Kaluza, adding that “houses are moving very, very quickly.”

She said she’s heard “over and over again” from people who find a house, make a quick offer, and still hear back that the house is taken. Kaluza heard of an instance in which a house was put on the market and then taken off within two hours.

In other cases, the competition cranks up the original price of the house, forcing people to drop out of the bidding.

Kaluza said, “People need to be ready to pounce on a home and submit an offer,” but also noted the trend toward making rushed bids is also “really concerning. Somebody might jump on an offer and might miss important steps.”

Buying a home is a long-term investment. Doing something ill-advised, like rushing into buying more house than the buyer can afford, can make life much harder down the road, Kaluza said.

Though people are more cautious now, she noted that many people fell into this trap during the 2008 housing bubble. “In general, I would really urge people to be patient.”

In the meantime, keep saving, and protect your credit by making payments on time and refraining from opening new lines of credit, Kaluza advises. “A home is still middle America’s biggest source of wealth. And it’s important. You don’t want it to be a drain. You want it to work for you.”

This article originally appeared the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

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Black History

Local legend referee excelled in more than sports

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception. The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

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Jim Robinson (Photo by: Charles Hallman | MSR News)
By Charles Hallman
It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception.

The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

Ed Prohofsky, who succeeded McMoore as MPS AD, saw me attending local basketball coaching clinics and told McMoore about me. Both he and Robinson sit together at Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx games, and this columnist purposely pays his respects to these two elders.

After high school, Robinson was convinced by the late James Griffin, St. Paul’s first Black deputy fire chief, to pursue officiating as a second career and began to ref all over the state of Minnesota. I got to know Griffin, who along with Jimmy Lee was one of the first Black officials in Minnesota. He often advised me on my writing.

I first met Robinson when the late Kwame McDonald, a colleague, mentor and friend, introduced us at the summer league he ran and asked me to coach in the late 1980s. McDonald once coached Lisa Lissimore, the Minneapolis Public Schools(MSHSL) associate director, on the Summit-University women’s basketball team.

Lissimore recommended Robinson for one of the seven NCAA Living Legend awards handed out during the Men’s Final Four in April. She included a Black History Month piece I wrote in 2018 as part of her supporting documentation.

If you’re keeping count, that’s five degrees of separation of James Robinson, the first Black official to referee in the Minnesota State Boys’ Basketball Tournament in the 1970s; in total, he worked seven state tournaments. He refereed both football and basketball for many years in the Twin Cities and throughout Minnesota, then focused solely on hoops both at the high school and college levels.

The Big Ten selected Robinson in 1971 as a basketball official, and he became one of the first Black referees to work Division I sports. He worked Big Ten, Division I, II, and III games for 16 years before a knee injury forced him to retire. He then became a supervisor of officials both for the Big Ten and as MSHSL high school basketball officials coordinator and supervisor ever since.

A longtime advocate for Black officials, Robinson for many years has held officiating camps, helped found a minority officials association in Minnesota, and was a National Federation of Basketball Rules Writing Committee member.

During the late 1960s, local community folk approached Robinson to apply for the director of the Summit University Teen Center, which was developing a new social services concept, the “drop-in center.” He has now been at “The Loft” since 1967.

What I didn’t know about Robinson was that he is a master barber and served on the Minnesota Board of Barber Examiners. I later learned that as a youngster growing up in St. Paul he was the first Black elected as the citywide student chief of the school patrol boys, and as a teenager was selected to attend Minnesota’s Boys State where his peers selected him “Mayor of Boy’s State.”

Robinson’s impressive resume includes inductions into the Minnesota Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Honor and the MSHSL Hall of Fame.

“Who determines a legend?” Robinson, ever modest, responded when asked where the NCAA Living Legend honor ranks. “I would not rank [myself] so high.”

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

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