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Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE) names Stacie Clayton, VP of Government and Community Affairs

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE — Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE) recently announced the addition of Stacie Clayton as the vice president of government and community affairs.

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Stacie Clayton

By Patreice A. Massey

Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE) recently announced the addition of Stacie Clayton as the vice president of government and community affairs.

“Stacie’s proven commitment to serving Detroit and its residents, including her perpetual drive to enact positive results, makes her the perfect person to lead our reenergized government and community engagement efforts,” said Michael Marr, chief operating officer. “We’re focused on being a good neighbor in our community and we’re excited about the new approach that Stacie adds to our team.”

Clayton brings over 25 years of extensive experience working with Michigan’s government, corporate and non-profit sectors. Prior to joining DRE, Clayton was the assistant director for the Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives and her previous positions included leadership roles in the City of Detroit Mayor’s, Council and Clerk’s Offices. She also served as vice president of external affairs for the Detroit Super Bowl XL Host Committee. Additionally, Clayton has been appointed to several government task forces and business advisory boards, including being a current member of the Michigan Civil Rights Commission.

“As a Detroit resident, I am delighted to join a team so devoted to serving Detroit’s community and protecting our environment,” said Clayton. “This is a team committed to creating a positive impact in many ways and it’s an honor to be a part of that effort.”

Clayton holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a Master of Business Administration from Wayne State University.

Detroit Renewable Energy, LLC is the holding company formed in 2010 for the independent operations of Detroit Thermal, LLC; Detroit Renewable Power LLC, operator of the Detroit energy-from-waste plant; and Hamtramck Energy Services, LLC, operator of private steam plants at seven General Motors facilities.

For more information, visit www.detroitrenewable.com.

This article originally appeared in the Michigan Chronicle.

#NNPA BlackPress

Colorado Petroleum Council Focus on Enhancing Communities

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The natural gas and oil industry is projected to create 1.3 million new jobs between 2015 and 2025, with that number growing to 1.9 million by 2035. Of these new jobs, 707,000, or 38 percent of the total, are projected to be filled by African American and Hispanic workers through 2035.

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A big part of CPC’s efforts to enhance communities is focused on aggressively pursuing investments in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education given its crucial role in the sustainment of career opportunities for all Coloradans. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
A big part of CPC’s efforts to enhance communities is focused on aggressively pursuing investments in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education given its crucial role in the sustainment of career opportunities for all Coloradans. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Four years ago, the American Petroleum Institute, the world’s largest energy industry trade association, opened a chapter in Colorado, owing to the growing opportunities from natural gas and oil in the state. Since its inception, the Colorado Petroleum Council has served as an advocate for – and partner to – communities across the state, placing great emphasis on innovation, public health and safety. This has allowed the industry the ability to invest in reducing its emissions to historic lows even as energy production has reached all-time highs.

“Most importantly, Colorado is our home,” said Lynn Granger, the new Executive Director of the Colorado Petroleum Council.  “When we arrived in Colorado, our mission wasn’t simply to grow jobs and economic opportunities for the people of our state, though we are encouraged with our progress on that front. We breathe the same air and drink the same water as our neighbors, and we are proud of the leading role that our industry has played – and will continue to play – in the development and implementation of emissions-reducing technologies that benefit all of Colorado’s vibrant communities, regardless of income level, color or creed.”

A big part of CPC’s efforts to enhance communities is focused on aggressively pursuing investments in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education given its crucial role in the sustainment of career opportunities for all Coloradans.

“We’re especially proud of our commitment to education,” continued Granger. “Our industry has taken a leading role in promoting STEM education across Colorado. The natural gas and oil industry continues to grow amidst the American energy renaissance, creating jobs that need to be filled with talented, skilled workers. We are focused on ensuring that Coloradans from every walk of life are given a true and just opportunity to benefit from these opportunities, and the foundation for future success begins in the classroom.”

The natural gas and oil industry is projected to create 1.3 million new jobs between 2015 and 2025, with that number growing to 1.9 million by 2035. Of these new jobs, 707,000, or 38 percent of the total, are projected to be filled by African American and Hispanic workers through 2035.

According to a 2018 report based on state and federal data, natural gas and oil operations support over 232,900 Colorado jobs, provide an annual statewide economic impact of more than $31.4 billion, and contribute more than $1.2 billion per year in public revenue to the state, including $180 million toward local universities and school districts.

“These jobs and dollars support communities across Colorado, funding everything from schools, to roads, to emergency responders,” noted Granger. “But they do so much more than that. This has allowed us to redouble our commitment to education at the local level and to serve as true partners in communities across the state. We are proud of the work we have done thus far, but know that there is more to be done for current and future generations of Coloradans.”

Colorado’s natural gas and oil industry, in partnership with dozens of government agencies, has implemented the most robust regulatory framework in the nation. Granger acknowledged that the industry’s growth, and the burgeoning opportunities it provides, can only be sustained with an all-hands effort toward keeping public health and safety paramount.

“None of what our industry does would be worthwhile if not for a round-the-clock effort to mitigate any environmental impacts that could have adverse effects on Colorado communities,” said Granger. “These efforts have been my top priority since assuming this role, and I want the people of our state to know that I will be fierce in promoting a balance between sustainability and the opportunities our industry brings to the table.”

Granger, in closing, recognized the existing disparities in Colorado’s economy, and expressed determination on behalf of her industry to be proactive in addressing the issue.

“People have moved to Colorado in droves from across the country, which has certainly presented challenges. We are committed to turning those challenges into opportunities. Colorado’s economy consistently ranks as best in the nation, but these economic opportunities feel out of reach for too many people in our state. The natural gas and oil industry is committed to being a partner in changing this dynamic. Everyone deserves a shot at the American dream, and the Colorado Petroleum Council and our member companies are unwavering, through investments in education, innovation, and directly into communities, to bringing these dreams to life.”

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#NNPA BlackPress

The Texas Oil & Gas Association (TXOGA): Providing Opportunities

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Nearly 1.3 million job opportunities are projected in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries through 2030, and minority workers represent a critically vital and available talent pool to help meet the demands of the projected growth and expansion, according to the American Petroleum Institute (API), the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America’s oil and natural gas industry.

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The increased implementation of diversity and inclusion programs explain why nationally, African American and Hispanic workers are projected to account for close to 25 percent of new hires in management, business and financial jobs through 2035.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

The Texas Oil & Gas Association (TXOGA), a statewide trade association representing every facet of the Texas oil and natural gas industry including small independents and major producers, has for 100 years lived up to its mission of promoting a robust oil and natural gas industry while advocating for sound, science-based policies and free-market principles.

Today, the association says that all 10 sectors of the Texas oil and natural gas industry – from production, to pipelines to refineries – supported 348,570 direct jobs last year.

Those workers earned an average of about $130,000 a year – which was 2.3 times the average pay in other private sectors.

It’s those facts that underscore why many – including African Americans and Latinos – are turning to the oil and natural gas industry for careers they know will pay family-sustaining wages.

Nearly 1.3 million job opportunities are projected in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries through 2030, and minority workers represent a critically vital and available talent pool to help meet the demands of the projected growth and expansion, according to the American Petroleum Institute (API), the only national trade association that represents all aspects of America’s oil and natural gas industry.

The industry continuously seeks ways to better diversify its employment makeup, TXOGA said.

The increased implementation of diversity and inclusion programs explain why nationally, African American and Hispanic workers are projected to account for close to 25 percent of new hires in management, business and financial jobs through 2035.

“The oil and natural gas industry provides some of the most high-paying, desirable jobs that offer great benefits and the opportunity to make a difference, and the employees of the Texas oil and natural gas industry are making life better for people here and across the world,” said TXOGA President Todd Staples.

“Many may not know the level of technological innovation and sophistication of the industry or the fact that oil and natural gas impacts nearly every aspect of modern life,” Staples said.

“Oil and natural gas are the building blocks of 96% of the everyday essentials we use. From cell phones and computers, to cosmetics and clothing, to medical devices and contact lenses, the list is lengthy,” Staples said.

“Ingenuity and innovation are increasing efficiency and companies are investing billions of dollars in advanced technologies that are protecting and improving our environment and, with expanded exports of LNG, other countries are improving their air by using more natural gas for electricity,” he said.

But the industry isn’t just made up of the engineers who help make these accomplishments possible. The job opportunities vary widely and require diverse backgrounds including attorneys, architects, truck drivers, welders, carpenters, accountants and human resources specialists, to name a few.

“Whether you specialize in business development, chemistry, construction or public relations, there’s an opportunity for almost every type of background in the oil and natural gas industry,” Staples said.

Collectively, the membership of TXOGA produces in excess of 90 percent of Texas’ crude oil and natural gas, operates over 80 percent of the state’s refining capacity, and is responsible for the vast majority of the state’s pipelines.

In fiscal year 2018, the oil and natural gas industry paid just over $14 billion in state and local taxes and state royalties, funding Texas schools, roads and first responders.

Lee Warren of Marathon Oil, an independent global energy company specializing in exploration and production and a member company of TXOGA, said diversity of background, experiences and thought among the workforce is critical to their success.

Warren said the percentage of minorities among their total staff increased to 33.3% in 2018, and Marathon Oil will continue to focus on ways to improve those metrics even more in the future.

“Many Marathon Oil jobs, including the majority of our leadership positions, require a degree in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subjects,” Warren said.

“We broaden the pool of diverse job candidates by reaching out to local student chapters of the Society of Women Engineers, the National Society of Black Engineers, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, LGBTQ Engineers and other organizations. We also use digital methods to recruit at approximately 17 universities to reach diverse job candidates,” she said.

The company also awards scholarships to increase the number of qualified diverse hires in the U.S.

In 2018, Marathon Oil funded college scholarships totaling $280,000 for students to study core disciplines and that included approximately $150,000 for diverse students with a record of academic excellence studying engineering and geosciences at the University of Texas, Texas A&M University and the University of Houston.

In addition to college recruiting, Marathon Oil continues to look for ways to hire, retain and promote more women and under-represented minorities.

Marathon Oil partners with organizations such as Women in Energy, Pink Petro, Hispanic Alliance for Career Advancement (HACE) and Human Rights Campaign to make their members aware of career opportunities with Marathon Oil, Warren said.

“These relationships also give our employees networking and professional development opportunities. For example, we hosted the 2018 Mujeres de HACE Leadership Program and 2019 HACE Executive Leadership tour, where several Marathon Oil Hispanic leaders were among a diverse group that participated in leadership and career development conversations,” Warren said.

“Additionally, when two of our senior executives were recognized as Savoy Magazine’s Most Influential Blacks in Corporate America in 2018, it created ongoing career development and professional networking opportunities for our African American employees. Marathon Oil employees also attended an African American Executive Leadership Council event,” she said.

Further, Texas energy producers are fueling education with oil and natural gas industry dollars — the state received about $2 billion in royalties in 2018 — paid into Texas’ Permanent School Fund and Permanent University Fund.

The Permanent School Fund has reached a new high of $44 billion and is the largest educational endowment in America, according to officials.

The Texas energy industry also pays property taxes to independent school districts, accounting for billions of dollars each year for public schools in the state.

In some communities, the oil and natural gas share of the school district’s tax base tops 70, 80 and even 90 percent, according to data released annually by TXOGA.

The energy community also is cultivating the next generation of STEM graduates and skilled workers with innovative education programs and productive partnerships with some of Texas’ leading colleges and universities, TXOGA officials said.

Jobs that require STEM skills and training currently comprise 20 percent of all jobs in the U.S. economy, according to API.

Current projections anticipate that the STEM economy will grow about 9 percent between 2014 and 2024—faster than the growth rate projected for all other occupations.

As an industry that supports 7.6 percent of the U.S economy and 10.3 million American jobs, many of which are STEM jobs, the oil and natural gas industry has a great interest in better understanding and promoting the relationship between STEM education and employment, officials said.

In addition to the millions of jobs already supported by the industry, IHS projects that through 2035 nearly 1.9 million direct job opportunities will be available in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries.

“These achievements and opportunities represent more than bragging rights,” Staples said.

“The women and men who work in the Texas oil and natural gas industry are growing our economy, funding our schools, building our roads, and most importantly, they’re securing our future,” he said.

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#NNPA BlackPress

COMMENTARY: Plastics are strangling the planet

NNPA NEWSWIRE — You have probably heard about islands of plastic (and other garbage) inhabiting our oceans. The impact of this is the dying off of entire segments of oceans. In addition, many countries in the global North, including but not limited to the USA, look at the countries of the global South as a massive garbage dump. What we use and use-up, we then send to the global South to be disposed of.

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Bill Fletcher, Jr. is a proud father and grandfather. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and www.billfletcherjr.com. Check out his mystery thriller The Man Who Fell From the Sky.

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor

On my morning walk I pass a tree every day that has a long plastic bag stuck in the branches. I keep wondering whether my neighbor realizes that the bag is strangling the tree. I am not exaggerating. The plastic is not simply sitting on the branches but is cutting off air to the tree. Over time, that branch could die. Think about that the next time you are driving and see plastic bags flying around landing on bushes and trees. This is not a neutral issue.

I thought, again, about this matter of plastics when I read a fascinating piece in the Guardian concerning the global glut of plastics and the role of the USA in the proliferation of plastic material. It is not just that we, in the USA, are producing an abundance of plastic material. It is that we are shipping the waste overseas to the global South for, alleged, recycling or, in other cases, for simply dumping. A global version of “not in my backyard.”

You have probably heard about islands of plastic (and other garbage) inhabiting our oceans. The impact of this is the dying off of entire segments of oceans. In addition, many countries in the global North, including but not limited to the USA, look at the countries of the global South as a massive garbage dump. What we use and use-up, we then send to the global South to be disposed of.

A recent global conference on plastics was stymied by the Trump administration which wished to take little to no responsibility for the proliferation of plastics and blamed the current glut on Asian countries. What was so disingenuous about this is the historical role of the USA in promoting the use of plastics and paying no attention to disposal. Instead, the Trump administration acted as if there was no dirt on its shoes, or perhaps, no plastic sticking to its shoes (?), and that the blame lay elsewhere.

It is critical to highlight this issue to remind ourselves that the environmental challenges facing the planet are not solely about climate change, as critical as that happens to be. There is environmental catastrophe unfolding, much of which is playing out in our oceans.

In this context, the notion of “America First,” in addition to having been a slogan of pre-World War 2 US fascists, is the slogan of idiots. The USA does not exist on planet Earth by itself. The planetary crisis in plastics is one that no one nation-state can resolve alone. There must be a collective pact, and this necessitates a shift in the attitude of an arrogant US administration. This, of course, will only happen through a combination of mass pressure and the electoral removal of those who think that one can ‘make America great again,’ while watching planet Earth die.

Bill Fletcher, Jr. is the former president of TransAfrica Forum. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and www.billfletcherjr.com. Look for his murder mystery The Man Who Fell From the Sky.

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Afro

Power52 Prepares Citizens for Work in Solar Industry

THE AFRO — Ten individuals from Baltimore City and surrounding counties recently graduated from Power52 Energy Institute poised for a life of sustained success and self-sufficiency. The institute is the centerpiece of Power52, a solar initiative that provides employment training for at-risk adults, returning citizens, and underserved individuals in preparation for careers in the solar industry as well as other green job opportunities.

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Former Baltimore Raven Ray Lewis (Courtesy Photo)
By Tiffany Ginyard

Ten individuals from Baltimore City and surrounding counties recently graduated from Power52 Energy Institute poised for a life of sustained success and self-sufficiency. The institute is the centerpiece of Power52, a solar initiative that provides employment training for at-risk adults, returning citizens, and underserved individuals in preparation for careers in the solar industry as well as other green job opportunities.

Connected over collective interests to create solutions to social challenges in disadvantaged communities, Cherrie Brooks, a Baltimore-based solar developer; Rob Wallace, a real estate executive; and Ray Lewis an iconic NFL star designed a workforce program dedicated to creating community solutions using solar initiatives for a long-term community development strategy of breaking cycles of poverty, unemployment, under employment and incarceration in urban communities across the nation.

From their deeply rooted faith, the three shared a vision of strengthening individuals from the inside and the pride that comes when one builds his future with his own hands.

Power52 Energy Institute in Baltimore City offers an accredited eleven-week comprehensive training program which includes services to help ensure that the people are successful.  Power 52 believes that, “much like the power itself, the future and opportunities of those it benefits should be sustainable too.”

Here, former Baltimore Raven Ray Lewis tells the AFRO shares how Power52 has impacted lives and why he’s aligned his life’s work with this initiative.

AFRO: How did you get started with this initiative?

Ray Lewis: Well I think it was a collective vision that we all came together on with very quickly after the unrest of Freddie grey in 2015 you know, after walking the streets and trying to find out what the real issue was stemming from, you know the quality of jobs we came to hone in on. Then we sat down a few times and really thought about it, worked on it and Me, Cherrie and Daniel came up with how we could use what Rob and his father have done for many years with this energy, and solar. So, we sat down and thought how do we make this work for the community, how do we truly add to the workforce element. And I think that’s how this just naturally happened and with me being a part of it was kind of a natural thing.

AFRO: How does Power52 Institute prepare individuals with tools for self-sufficiency?

Ray Lewis: True tools! like tools you can actually steal. Things you can look at when you go through our course, and one of the reason we have an 85 percent placement rate. The moment somebody leaves or graduates Power 52’s 11 to 16-week program, we are getting people jobs immediately. And keep in mind, these are people that have been told, “You can’t,” and “No, your record does not show this,” and “You got this history of this.” Everybody has made a mistake somewhere in life and that’s why the rebuilding of individuals and giving them their imagination back again is important.

Think about solar energy and climate change. Think about all of these different things that are starting to happen. When I tell you we are one of the very few black companies in solar. But that’s the way we are going; our planet is going solar regardless. We have to; the climate is dictating it and everything around us is dictating it. So we are saying as a company, “No we will not be last in this field.” “No we will be more engaged in this field and we will educate people so they can understand how not to just hold a job.”

AFRO: Why makes this initiative unique?

Ray Lewis: I’ve been a part of Baltimore a long time. From day one living in Baltimore, I asked, “why don’t we have anyone from the community working in our community?  The reason I am going this route is to show the power of Power 52. Power 52 takes us in each and every community; and it does not hustle the community, it does not ponder something that cannot happen. We promise you a new life, we promise you a new path, but you have to do the work. That’s the beauty of it!

This article originally appeared in The Afro

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Crime

PRESS ROOM: Don’t Fall Victim To Scams From Fake Cps Energy Callers

SAN ANTONIO OBSERVER — In 2018, CPS Energy saw an increase in the number of customers reporting to have been victimized by someone representing themselves as a CPS Energy employee to steal money from them. CPS Energy urges their customers to be on full alert for individuals posing as CPS Energy employees either by phone or in person.

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Photo by: cpsenergy.com

By CPS

San Antonio – Texas, (May 31, 2019) – In 2018, CPS Energy saw an increase in the number of customers reporting to have been victimized by someone representing themselves as a CPS Energy employee to steal money from them. CPS Energy urges their customers to be on full alert for individuals posing as CPS Energy employees either by phone or in person.

Knowing how CPS Energy operates is the first step to recognize imposter activity. CPS Energy says if customers receive calls from anyone claiming to be from the utility who threatens to cut off service if payment is not made immediately, they should hang up and call customer service directly at 210-353-2222. And if someone approaches their home or business claiming to be from CPS Energy, always ask for an employee ID. If a customer feels like they are in immediate danger, they should call 911.

“We want residential and commercial customers to protect themselves from scammers going after their hard-earned money,” said Maria Garcia, Vice President of Community Engagement and Corporate Responsibility. “The only time we will call customers is to remind them when their account is past due.  However, we do not take payments over the phone.”

Payments can be made through Manage My Account (MMA), a free online portal. MMA also provides CPS Energy customers with monthly energy use information, a view of their billing statement and payment arrangements options.

Last year, CPS Energy received a combined 1,799 reports from both residential and commercial customers who fell victim to scams. In all, thieves were able to steal nearly $52,000, an increase of $20,000 from 2017.

CPS Energy employees will:

  • NEVER threaten to disconnect service at your home or business.

  • NEVER call residential or commercial customers to request payment by phone.

  • NEVER ask a customer to purchase credit cards or prepaid cards (for example, Amazon gift cards) and call back with payment.

  • NEVER ask to enter a customer’s home or business unless the customer initiates a request for service or receives prior notification.

Signs that the call is a scam:

·         Threatening to cut off power. Scam artists demand quick action as a scare tactic.

·         Asks customer to purchase any prepaid card to make payment.

·         Once the imposter gets the card’s PIN or security number, it’s like wiring money.

          The funds cannot be recovered

·         Sends customer to CVS Pharmacy/Office Depot/Walgreens to make a payment

·         Refuses option to pay at H-E-B, claims it takes 24 hours to receive payment.

·         Claims recent payment was not received or was misapplied.

·         Gives customer 30 minutes to pay or get shut-off.

·         Caller claims someone from CPS Energy is on the way to turn power off.

·         Asks customer for banking information.

·         Caller asks customer for their account number.

·         Supplies customer with an account number to apply a payment.

·         Gives a toll free (i.e.: 1-800 or 1-844) number to have customer call back with

          payment.

This article originally appeared in the San Antonio Observer

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#NNPA BlackPress

Energy, Media Professionals Offer STEM Advice to Indy Youth at National Conference

NNPA NEWSWIRE — In addition to meeting energy professionals, the students received advice on creating and maintaining a successful career in STEM. Several companies, including Southern California Edison, American Petroleum Institute (API), British Petroleum (BP), and the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), entertained questions and offered advice to attendees.

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“There are tremendous career opportunities in the energy sector for African Americans,” said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., President and CEO of the NNPA. “The future is going to be determined by how well humanity utilizes science to solve our problems, and I encourage young people in the Black community to get involved with STEM programs at a young age. One thing I intend to do with NNPA is to raise more public awareness about the opportunities in the energy sector for Black Americans.”

By Demi Vaughn, Special to the NNPA Newswire

The American Association of Blacks in Energy (AABE), a national organization with a 50-year history of educating young people on the importance of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, recently left an indelible mark on the Indianapolis youth, during their 42nd annual conference.

Held at the Marriott Downtown, more than 600 energy leaders attended the four-day conference, which opened powerful discussions on the field’s emerging policies, career options, entrepreneurial involvement, and social responsibility.

Among the event’s key activities — the AABE Youth Forum — featuring 25 aspiring engineers from Pike High school, proved most exciting.

In addition to meeting energy professionals, the students received advice on creating and maintaining a successful career in STEM. Several companies, including Southern California Edison, American Petroleum Institute (API), British Petroleum (BP), and the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), entertained questions and offered advice to attendees.

Tyrone Mitchell, a Diversity and Inclusion Manager at BP, said that internships prove very important once students enter college.

“Please be focused on getting internships. Getting that experience cannot only benefit you in the workplace, but you will also know what industry you like and don’t like,” Mitchell said. “I was able to get an internship with BP, and I chose to come on to BP because of the experience they gave me. So, it made the transition easier for me.”

David Ford, a mechanical engineer at Southern California Edison agreed with Mitchell’s assessment of internships, but also admonished students to gain focus as a means of successfully navigating college.

“There’s a lot of things you’re going to deal with in college. Focus on the most important things you need to do every day,” said Ford. “During your first year in college it’s really important that you get a discipline down, because if you don’t you can easily blow it.”

At the end of the session, students received a surprise visit from Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., a civil rights leader, and President and CEO of NNPA.

“There are tremendous career opportunities in the energy sector for African Americans,” Chavis said. “The future is going to be determined by how well humanity utilizes science to solve our problems, and I encourage young people in the Black community to get involved with STEM programs at a young age. One thing I intend to do with NNPA is to raise more public awareness about the opportunities in the energy sector for Black Americans.”

Chavis, who has a background in chemistry, said that he thinks the educational system doesn’t prepare millennials of any race for the world of the future.

“The world of the future is going to be much more of a global economy. It’s going to be more science- and data-based, and more coding. Some schools don’t even teach these things, while other schools do. There are inequities in the educational system, and some are racial inequities. At the NNPA, I’m trying to challenge some of these racial inequities when it comes to education and career opportunities.”

Chavis was the editor of his high school newspaper and said that his science background has improved his skills as both a reader and writer.

“Developing an appetite at a young age to read, write, and to be a journalist is so important. I encourage young writers and journalists to use their pens to promote social change, and ensure our communities are treated fairly.”

Paula Glover, CEO of AABE, said that opportunities abound in the energy industry for students of all majors.

“If you look across college majors, you may have students who are history majors who work in public policy. Two of our executives were music majors, and they went on to law school; they work in our industry in either environmental policy, environmental law, or health and safety.”

Demi Vaughn is a senior at Ball State University, and can be reached at dmvaughn@bsu.edu

Chavis, who has a background in chemistry, said that he thinks the educational system doesn’t prepare millennials of any race for the world of the future.

Chavis, who has a background in chemistry, said that he thinks the educational system doesn’t prepare millennials of any race for the world of the future. (photo: Nathanael Corrales)

 

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