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By The Charleston Chronicle

Each fiscal year the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department contracts a professional visual artist to serve as the City’s Artist-in-Residence (AIR). The department is currently seeking to fill the position for fiscal year 2019/20. The City’s Artist-in-Residence serves as a key resource for the department’s outreach programs, especially in the area of art instruction. The selected artist will share his/her unique skills, talents, and experiences by providing free visual art residencies, workshops, and demonstrations in public schools, recreation facilities, and community gathering spaces within the city limits of North Charleston. Local visual artists with a willingness to share their talents and an ability to work with students of all ages are invited to apply for the part-time, contracted position by Friday, June 28, 2019.

At the written request of art teachers and school liaisons, the AIR will conduct visual art residencies at North Charleston schools throughout the 2019/20 school year. Additional workshops and demos will be coordinated at the request of community groups, as well as during the 2020 North Charleston Arts Fest. The AIR will also conduct a workshop for the department’s monthly Creative Arts Workshop program and offer instruction for summer arts camps in June 2020. In addition, the AIR will present an exhibition of his/her work at the North Charleston City Gallery from December 2019 through January 2020. Additional exhibition opportunities are available during the North Charleston Arts Fest in May. Past artists who served in the position include Quintin Chaplin (2018/19), Camela Guevara (2017/18), Caroline M. Self (2016/17), Daryle Halbert (2015/16), Alexandra Roberts (2014/15), Charlynn Knight (2013/14), Kristy Bishop (2012/13), Lori Starnes Isom (2011/12), Deborah Meyer (2010/11), and Robert Maniscalco (2009/10).

Rate of pay for this part-time, contracted position is $25 an hour for up to 300 hours completed from August 2019 through June 2020. Program supplies are provided. A background check is required. Interested artists should submit quality photographs or digital images of their work along with a current résumé or CV reflecting their exhibition and teaching experience by 5:00pm on Friday, June 28, 2019. Application materials may be emailed to kyeadon@northcharleston.org or mailed to the attention of Krystal Yeadon at City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, PO Box 190016, North Charleston, SC, 29419-9016.

For more information about the Artist-in-Residence program, or the department’s other programs, exhibits, and events, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website at www.northcharleston.org or call 843-740-5854.

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

Art

Google Offers Job to Davian Chester, the Artist Who Created the Viral Juneteenth Doodle

OAKLAND POST — In the new age of technol­ogy, social media networks like Twitter and Instagram are serving as effective recruiting channels. In addition, often times tal­ented candidates are finding jobs without applying the tra­ditional way. These candidates are being recruited by employ­ers through social media be­cause of their highly engaged profiles that display their ex­pertise and skills.

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Davian Chester. Photo courtesy of gossiponthis.com.
By Brittani Hunter

In the new age of technol­ogy, social media networks like Twitter and Instagram are serving as effective recruiting channels.

In addition, often times tal­ented candidates are finding jobs without applying the tra­ditional way. These candidates are being recruited by employ­ers through social media be­cause of their highly engaged profiles that display their ex­pertise and skills.

Recently, artist Davian Chester was offered a job by Google after his photo of his Juneteenth doodle went viral.

Google is known for mak­ing creative doodles for holi­days and historical milestones, but when they somehow forgot to commemorate Juneteenth, Chester decided to take mat­ters into his own hands.

“I was planning on mak­ing an art piece for it anyway, but I noticed Google did not do anything at all. And for a large company like that to cre­ate doodles for literally every­thing under the sun and have nothing at all today, I thought it was odd, ” Chester shared.

“I feel it’s very important for us to know as much as we can about our ancestors,” Ches­ter said. “So I feel Juneteenth is already something that isn’t be­ing spread across as much as it should be.

The sketch of a Black per­son’s hands breaking free of shackles formed to spell out the word “Google” went viral and by the end of the day had been shared by hundreds of thou­sands of users on social media.

Chester’s talent and viral post ended up getting the atten­tion of tech giant Google. On June 24th, just five days after his doodle went viral, Ches­ter revealed on Facebook that Google offered him a job.

This article originally appeared in the Oakland Post
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Art

Music director Jermaine Hill shares his passion for working in the theater

ROLLINGOUT— Hill’s journey in musical theater began at 5 years old when he started playing the piano. He grew up in New York with an affinity for Broadway productions and went on to receive a Bachelor of Music from Ithaca College and a Master of Music from New England Conservatory in Boston. In addition to his work with Goodman Theatre and other regional playhouses, Hill is an assistant professor of theater and music director at Columbia College Chicago.

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Jermaine Hill (Photo courtesy of the Goodman Theatre)

By Eddy “Precise” Lamarre

Jermaine Hill is currently serving as the music director for the production of “The Music Man” at Goodman Theatre in Chicago.

Hill’s journey in musical theater began at 5 years old when he started playing the piano. He grew up in New York with an affinity for Broadway productions and went on to receive a Bachelor of Music from Ithaca College and a Master of Music from New England Conservatory in Boston. In addition to his work with Goodman Theatre and other regional playhouses, Hill is an assistant professor of theater and music director at Columbia College Chicago.

Rolling out spoke with Hill about his passion and experience as a Black man working in this space.

When did you know that music direction was something that you could do well?

I music directed a cabaret my senior year of high school and knew that was what I wanted to do. I loved performing, but there is something about helping other actors to bring their characters to life that I’m passionate about.

Talk about your experience as a Black musical director in the theater.

I did feel a bit of a sense of “Who is this guy?” when I first started working at some of the larger houses, but I hope that the quality of my work demonstrates that I work hard to be good at what I do. I think it’s important for all of us who are working in the field to serve as examples to future generations of artists and to give back to and mentor other artists in our communities. It is critical for institutions to have serious conversations around institutional power and maintaining accountability and transparency to communities and artists who are still underrepresented.

“The Music Man” is your latest job. What can the audience expect that is unique to you?

I dive deeply into score study and text analysis to try to bring the composer and lyricist’s vision alive. I find that my attention to detail and specificity is the key to unlocking compelling performances from the actors I work with.

What are your top two favorite musicals?

I love “The Wiz.” It was the first musical I did in high school and one of the reasons I knew I wanted to do musical theater professionally. The music is iconic. The show is an extraordinary achievement in terms of how it reimagines a “traditional” story and gives voice and visibility to theater-makers and musical styles not traditionally represented.

“The Light in the Piazza” is one of the most stunning, challenging and ultimately fulfilling scores in the musical theater canon. Adam Guettel wrote an incredibly gorgeous neo-classical work, and I think every moment of the score is absolutely brilliant. Every time I hear the last song in the show, “Fable,” I burst into tears.

What is next for you?

I start rehearsals for “The Color Purple,” then I move into serving as director [for] “A Man of No Importance” at Columbia College Chicago. After that, I move into rehearsals for “Sophisticated Ladies” where I’ll be music directing and serving as a pianist [and] conductor.

“The Music Man” runs through Aug. 11, 2019, at Goodman Theatre in Chicago.

This article originally appeared in Rollingout.com
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Art

North Charleston Artist Anik Hall Paints Chicora/Cherokee History

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Fresh Future Farm was awarded a Southern Creative Places grant from South Arts to create public art that educates, creates conversations and increases community pride. Farm staff worked closely with the SC History Room at the Charleston County Main Library and Don Campagna, History and Archives Coordinator for the City of North Charleston to verify and uncover little known historic information. Anik Hall, the Farm’s 23-year-old Special Projects Manager, collaged images of the neighborhood from the 1500’s to the present and received approval from the City to begin the work.

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Anik Hall (Photo by: charlestonchronicle.net)

By The Charleston Chronicle

Fresh Future Farm was awarded a Southern Creative Places grant from South Arts to create public art that educates, creates conversations and increases community pride. Farm staff worked closely with the SC History Room at the Charleston County Main Library and Don Campagna, History and Archives Coordinator for the City of North Charleston to verify and uncover little known historic information. Anik Hall, the Farm’s 23-year-old Special Projects Manager, collaged images of the neighborhood from the 1500’s to the present and received approval from the City to begin the work.

Comcast employees prepped the space for the project last spring. Hall translated the collage mock-up into a 50’ x 12’ life sized replica on the back wall of FFF’s grocery store. Staff members started recording oral histories using the StoryCorps app. To complement its work, FFF was awarded a fellowship from the League of Creative Interventionists, a national organization invested in building a network of artists doing creative placemaking work.

The Farm will host a community dinner that celebrates the mural’s completion and expands their oral histories project to include additional narratives from current and former residents later this year. These videos will be recorded for FFF’s YouTube channel and future podcast. Fresh Future Farm and the League will post event details on social media when they are available.

As part of Fresh Future Farm’s Kickstarter capital campaign, donors can pay to have their names added to the mural. To view the public artwork, visit Fresh Future Farm Tuesdays through Fridays from 12 pm to 7 pm and Saturdays from 7 am to 12 pm. Current and former residents are invited to share pictures and stories with the farm by emailing Anik at specialprojects.freshfuturefarm@gmail.com. All collected information will live on the Farm’s YouTube page and in a scrapbook.

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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