Jorge Ferreira

Jorge Ferreira

This photo taken Dec. 8, 2014 shows Alameda County Deputy Sheriff Jorge Ferreira in front of the REACH Crime Prevention unit in San Leandro, Calif. Jorge “Jinho” Ferreira feels the tension between being black and carrying a badge every day as a sheriff’s deputy in Alameda County, California. “I feel like you have to prove yourself on every level,” said Ferreira, 39, who patrols about 30 miles east of San Francisco. “You have to prove yourself to the black community, you have to prove yourself to all of your co-workers, you have to prove yourself to society.” With the nation roiled by two grand juries’ recent refusal to indict white police officers in the deaths of unarmed black men, some black police officers say that as they enforce the law, they also wonder whether the system they’re sworn to uphold is stacked against black men. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

This photo taken Dec. 8, 2014 shows Alameda County Deputy Sheriff Jorge Ferreira in front of the REACH Crime Prevention unit in San Leandro, Calif. Jorge “Jinho” Ferreira feels the tension between being black and carrying a badge every day as a sheriff’s deputy in Alameda County, California. “I feel like you have to prove yourself on every level,” said Ferreira, 39, who patrols about 30 miles east of San Francisco. “You have to prove yourself to the black community, you have to prove yourself to all of your co-workers, you have to prove yourself to society.” With the nation roiled by two grand juries’ recent refusal to indict white police officers in the deaths of unarmed black men, some black police officers say that as they enforce the law, they also wonder whether the system they’re sworn to uphold is stacked against black men. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

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