Black Girls Continue to Disappear but Few Eyebrows Are Raised

THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION CONTINUES ITS SERIES ON MISSING BLACK WOMEN AND GIRLS.

Aniyah Flythe/Courtesy DC Police
Aniyah Flythe/Courtesy DC Police

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

The epidemic of missing and mostly forgotten African American girls continues to spread throughout the United States.

While the names change, the stories remain similar.

Miah Gourdine/Courtesy Horry Police
Miah Gourdine/Courtesy Horry Police

Miah Gourdine, just 16-years-old, was headed to school on Tuesday, April 23, but when attendance was taken at Carolina Forest High School in Horry, South Carolina, Miah was marked absent.

What’s worse, she never returned home.

While authorities have speculated that because Miah is new to the area, she may have tried to return to her native New Jersey. However, that’s no consolation for her family who haven’t a clue as to her whereabouts.

When last seen, Miah was wearing blue jeans, a black and yellow shirt, black Puma sneakers and a clear fanny pack – certainly not the sign of a runaway.

Horry police have asked those with information to call 843-248-1520.

One week earlier on Friday, April 12, in Washington, D.C., 15-year-old Aniyah Flythe was seen walking along the 300 block of Anacostia Road in the Southeast section of the city.

Aniyah hasn’t been seen since.

Described by the Metropolitan Police Department as 5-feet-5-inches tall and 160 pounds, Aniyah has black hair and brown eyes and she was last seen wearing a white shirt, blue jeans and white glittery sneakers.

Aniyah Flythe/Courtesy DC Police
Aniyah Flythe/Courtesy DC Police

Aniyah is now listed on the District of Columbia’s critical missing person’s list and authorities are asking anyone with information to call 202-727-9099 or text 50411.

Though they live hundreds of miles apart, Miah and Aniyah have joined the heartbreaking list of more than 75,000 African American girls who’ve gone missing.

Officials at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Childrensaid their CyperTipline has received more than 18.4 million reports, most of which led to apparent child sexual abuse images: online enticement (including “sextortion”), child sex trafficking and child sexual molestation.

Recently, the nonprofit Black & Missing Foundation compiled statistics from the FBI which noted that in 2016 alone, 242,295 individuals of color were reported missing in the United States.

A stunning 36.7 percent of those missing were Black teens under the age of 18.

Daunting in the quest to find the girls is the continued lack of attention the missing receive – particularly those who are black and missing.

While mainstream media mostly ignores their plight, social media remains a buzz.

In one of the many efforts to use the internet and social media to help locate the missing, the website blackgirlslost.comintroduced another teen who disappeared:

Zaria Mccier/Courtesy National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
Zaria Mccier/Courtesy National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

“Hi, my name is Zaria Mccier and I’m 17 years old. Have you seen me around the Conyers, Georgia area? I have been missing since April 3. Can you help?”

Authorities are asking anyone who might have information regarding Zaria’s disappearance to call 770-483-2200.

As NNPA Newswire continues to report on the missing, readers and social media commenters have weighed in.

“The fact that there is such an imbalance in the media is horrible, I admit I was ignorant there was such an imbalance because the media is obviously biased,” said Margaret Clark Turnbow in response to an early story in the missing girls series.

“Young people of any color should be regarded as our country’s most valuable resource,” Turnbow said.

Said another reader, James Stallworth: “This is a major crisis for our communities, let’s stay aware everybody.”

“Please God, give us a clue as to where these babies are,” said Annette Ross.

Natalie Wilson, who co-founded the Black and Missing Foundation in 2008, said in a recent interviewthat many times when children of color are reported missing, they’re reported missing as a runaway.

“If you’re classified as a runaway, you do not receive the Amber Alert or any type of media coverage. Even if they did run away, we need to help them within 24 to 48 hours, because many of them are lured into sex trafficking,” Wilson said.

“We need to understand what are they running away from, and ultimately what are they running to. We’re also finding that when people of color — men and women — are reported missing, they’re deemed to be involved with some type of criminal act, they’re stereotyped and their cases aren’t taken seriously,” she said.

Advertisements
About Stacy M. Brown 284 Articles
A Little About Me: I'm the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider's Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.) My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.

15 Comments

  1. That’s just wrong. When a minor goes missing it shouldn’t matter at all why someone THINKS they are missing… all efforts should be made to FIND THEM to ensure they were not lured away into some God awful situation.

      • I remember in the 70s every year we would have an officer visit our school meet in the auditorium or classroom to keep us aware of these incidents and safety tips. Now it’s just a hush hush. They won’t even notify a serial killer in our cities.

  2. Thank God for this article, this is a subject that has bothered me for some time. There is something sinister going on in this country to our children disappearing and no REAL media coverage. I have been concerned about this for a while. Our kids are being snatched off the streets never to be heard from again. It is hurtful and very sad for their families.

  3. This is stress beyond stress this happens to all people of color. Families neighbors,need to work harder to police our communities watch our own children old school methods …

  4. I don’t understand all the stuff we see someone didn’t see anything wrong or out of place. Anything I can do , let look and fine our own kids . (Please)

  5. Please publish a calendar with all the missing black femalesthis is so Very , tragic, Horrible, terrible News to hear!! Exactly when I have a 14 year old daughter…

  6. Being a family member with over 5 ancestry Bloodlines, the smallest bloodline is African American.This is downright disgusting for anyone to kidnap and/or destroy anyone

  7. All lives matter. i share all alerts regardless. A person can travel 1,000 miles a day. Share the alerts. Carry a camera. Get a photo of suspicious people and their vehicles. You could be a hero.

  8. True…i also feel something is going on. I live in chicago and the other day there was two reported attempts of kidnapping 11yr old boy emptying the garbage before leaving for school at 7:30a 2 guys in a grey truck try to snatch him he got away. Just 2 miles away same area a 10yr girl on her way to school she described the same truck tried to snatch her she ran to school and told someone there was only 2 sec of news coverage and that was it. Its ironic that they say they care about r kelly messing with young girls and nationwide coverage on that if they so much care about black girls why this not nationwide news coverage make me further think what they really after with r kelly because clearly its not the black girls if so black people will get nationwide coverage just like the white kids..i just pray we all lookbout for our kids if we see something on the street that’s not right call 911. Its too many black teens girls and boys getting snatch either for sex trafficking or organs

  9. Satan is truly having his way!!I wish there was a way that people would freeze in the act of committing any type of crime. If it were only that easy, there has got to be a way to track these girls. Boy would I love to see a super hero right about now.

  10. Missing native women and girls and missing women and girls of color go unreported by the mainstream media. We need to put the word out ourselves.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.