Why Your Next Package Will Be Delivered By An Uber

In this Wednesday, March 18, 2015, file photo, the Uber app displays cars available to make a pickup in downtown Manhattan on a smart phone, in New York. A new report by expense management system provider Certify shows that 47 percent of the ground transportation rides by its users in March were through Uber. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
In this Wednesday, March 18, 2015, file photo, the Uber app displays cars available to make a pickup in downtown Manhattan on a smart phone, in New York. A new report by expense management system provider Certify shows that 47 percent of the ground transportation rides by its users in March were through Uber. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
In this Wednesday, March 18, 2015, file photo, the Uber app displays cars available to make a pickup in downtown Manhattan on a smart phone, in New York. A new report by expense management system provider Certify shows that 47 percent of the ground transportation rides by its users in March were through Uber. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

(TechCrunch) – Geographic saturation is the key to network effects and profitability in the ridesharing business.

The more drivers Uber or Lyft have in a given region, the faster the pick-up times, the better the customer experience and the more rider demand — which in turn allows drivers to earn more money and attracts more drivers to the network.

David Sacks best illustrated Uber’s positive feedback cycle last year:

If Sacks is right, that the ridesharing provider with the most geographic saturation ends up with the lowest costs and best rider experience, then the strategy is clear: Raise as much money as possible to subsidize both supply and demand in what, to some observers, appears to be a winner-take-all market.

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