White House and Republicans Clash Over C.I.A. Torture Report

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, left, and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., center, take an elevator to the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was scheduled to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, left, and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., center, take an elevator to the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was scheduled to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, left, and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., center, take an elevator to the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was scheduled to release a report on the CIA’s harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (New York Times) — With the long-awaited Senate report on the use of torture by the United States government — a detailed account that will shed an unsparing light on the Central Intelligence Agency’s darkest practices after the September 2001 terrorist attacks — set to be released Tuesday, the Obama administration and its Republican critics clashed over the wisdom of making it public, and the risk that it will set off a backlash overseas.

While the United States has put diplomatic facilities and military bases on alert for heightened security risks, administration officials said they do not expect the report — or rather the declassified executive summary of it that will be released Tuesday morning — to ignite the kind of violence that killed four Americans at a diplomatic outpost in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012. Such violent reprisals, they said, tend to be fueled more by perceived attacks against Islam as a religion than by violence against individual Muslims.

But some leading Republican lawmakers have warned against releasing the report, saying that domestic and foreign intelligence reports indicate that a detailed account of the brutal interrogation methods used by the C.I.A. during the George W. Bush administration could incite unrest and violence, even resulting in the deaths of Americans.

READ MORE

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.