U.S. Postal Service Want to Serve You Breakfast

In this Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, file photo, packages wait to be sorted in a Post Office as U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Michael McDonald, gathers mail to load into his truck before making his delivery run, in Atlanta. The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013 it is revamping its priority mail program as part of its efforts to raise revenue and drive new growth in its package delivery business. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
In this Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, file photo, packages wait to be sorted in a Post Office as U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Michael McDonald, gathers mail to load into his truck before making his delivery run, in Atlanta. The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013 it is revamping its priority mail program as part of its efforts to raise revenue and drive new growth in its package delivery business. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
(AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Joanna DeGeronimo, YAHOO NEWS

(Yahoo News)—The U.S. Postal Service wants to save you a trip to the supermarket.

The USPS is seeking approval from the Postal Regulatory Commission to deliver fresh groceries to private residences. The Postal Service submitted a proposal for a two-year test of the plan on Tuesday. It would offer the service in multiple cities and could roll it out on a broader scale by the end of October.

In the plan, the Postal Service would partner up with retailers who would drop off orders of groceries and other prepackaged items at local post offices between 1:30 am and 2:30 am. The USPS would then deliver the groceries to private homes between 3 am and 7 am.

Yahoo Finance Senior Columnist Michael Santoli says the plan makes sense from the USPS’s perspective. “We have a human being going to this address no matter what.” Adding a package to that route, he says is “incremental revenue without necessarily being also an incremental expense.”

In its filing this week, the U.S. Postal Service said that this plan could bring in an extra $10 million a year. However, the agency lost $5 billion in fiscal year 2013.

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