U.S. Dollar Fails to Get Usual Safety Bid from Volatility Short Term

U.S. Dollar Fails to Get Usual Safety Bid from Volatility Short Term

In this Sept. 24, 2013 file photo, a sheet of uncut $100 bills is inspected during the printing process at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas. Nobody knows when exactly, but the day will eventually come when the Federal Reserve nudges its benchmark lending rate from next to zero to something slightly higher. But that doesn’t mean the era of incredibly low interest rates will be over. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)
In this Sept. 24, 2013 file photo, a sheet of uncut $100 bills is inspected during the printing process at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas.  (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss and Anirban Nag, REUTERS

 
NEW YORK (Reuters) — Most bouts of global market volatility in recent years have featured one constant: the U.S. dollar strengthens as investors clamor for the perceived safety of U.S. assets such as Treasuries.

By contrast, over the last two previous trading days, the dollar lost 4.0 percent against the yen, while dropping to a seven-month low versus the euro on Monday, as world stock markets slumped and emerging market currencies plummeted.

The dollar’s weakness may continue in the short term, but analysts expect its longer term rally to continue eventually.

The greenback is still seen as a refuge for those with the closest links to China such as companies and investors operating in Australian, Canadian, and New Zealand dollars as well as a slew of emerging market currencies.

In the short term, two factors may be pressuring the dollar against the euro and yen.

 

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