Spending on NC Senate Race Tops $100M

In this Oct. 7, 2014, photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., makes a comment during a live televised debate with North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis at UNC-TV studios in Research Triangle Park, N.C. North Carolina’s Senate race boils down to a battle of extremes. At least that’s how Hagan and Tillis want voters to look at it. Running against President Barack Obama as much as he is against Hagan, Tillis calls the president’s health care law an “unworkable mess,” blasts American foreign policy as muddled and weak, and bemoans a $17 trillion-plus national debt. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, Pool)
In this Oct. 7, 2014, photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., makes a comment during a live televised debate with North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis at UNC-TV studios in Research Triangle Park, N.C. North Carolina’s Senate race boils down to a battle of extremes. At least that’s how Hagan and Tillis want voters to look at it. Running against President Barack Obama as much as he is against Hagan, Tillis calls the president’s health care law an “unworkable mess,” blasts American foreign policy as muddled and weak, and bemoans a $17 trillion-plus national debt. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, Pool)
In this Oct. 7, 2014, photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., makes a comment during a live televised debate with North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis at UNC-TV studios in Research Triangle Park, N.C. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, Pool)

PHILIP ELLIOTT, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Total spending in North Carolina’s tight Senate race has topped $100 million. That makes it the first Senate contest in the nation to cross that threshold.

The nonpartisan Sunlight Foundation has been tracking spending by candidates and their allies. The candidates themselves have spent more than $29 million, and their independent allies have spent close to $72 million.

Incumbent Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan is locked in a fierce and costly contest against Republican state House Speaker Thom Tillis. Polls show the two close.

More than half of the spending has gone toward television ads. Each side has spent roughly $27 million on ads, according to the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity’s analysis of ad-tracking firm Kantar/CMAG data.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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