Questions About Tulsa Reserve Deputy’s Qualifications

Questions About Tulsa Reserve Deputy’s Qualifications

In this screen shot from April 2, 2015 video provided by the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office, police restrain 44-year-old Eric Harris after he was chased down and tackled by a Tulsa County Deputy, and then shot by a reserve sheriff's deputy while in custody, in Tulsa, Okla. The sheriff's office said 73-year-old reserve deputy Robert Charles Bates fired the shot that killed Harris, believing he was using his stun gun instead of his service weapon when he opened fire. (AP Photo/Tulsa County Sheriff's Office)
In this screen shot from April 2, 2015 video provided by the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office, police restrain 44-year-old Eric Harris after he was chased down and tackled by a Tulsa County Deputy, and then shot by a reserve sheriff’s deputy while in custody, in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office)

 

TULSA, Okla. (CBS News) – There are allegations that the Tulsa reserve deputy who shot an unarmed man to death did not have the training that he claimed.

When Eric Harris, 44, ran from Tulsa deputies during a gun sting operation, reserve deputy Robert Bates, 73, was part of the team that chased him. Bates was considered an advanced reserve officer, meaning he was authorized to participate in active raids.

But after Bates says he mistakenly fired his personal gun instead of his taser, killing the suspect, questions were asked about his qualifications and weapons training.

CBS News has obtained Bates’ training record since he joined the Reserve Program in 2008. The documents show he had over 400 hours of law enforcement training.

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