Potency Labels Often Wrong on Medical-Marijuana Edibles, Study Finds

Potency Labels Often Wrong on Medical-Marijuana Edibles, Study Finds

In this Sept. 26, 2014 file photo, smaller-dose pot-infused cookies, called the Rookie Cookie, sit on the packaging table at The Growing Kitchen, in Boulder. Colorado health officials want to ban many edible forms of marijuana, including brownies, cookies and most candies, limiting sales of pot-infused food to lozenges and some liquids. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
In this Sept. 26, 2014 file photo, smaller-dose pot-infused cookies, called the Rookie Cookie, sit on the packaging table at The Growing Kitchen, in Boulder. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

 

(The Seattle Times) – Yet another sampling of marijuana products has found inaccurate labeling of potency.

A new article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports that all but one of the 23 edible products bought in Seattle medical-marijuana dispensaries last year were improperly labeled. Most of the baked goods, beverages and candy contained less THC than their labels said. THC is the main psychoactive chemical in marijuana.

Previous research, including by The Seattle Times, has found similar inaccuracies in medical marijuana and legal recreational pot. But the JAMA study’s lead author said his research was more rigorous than work by news organizations and others.

“If we want to recommend cannabis as medicine, patients should expect reliability and consistency in what they’re buying. The failure to do so is an injustice to the consumer and puts patients at risk,” said Ryan Vandrey, lead author and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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