Mistrial Declared in Trial of Officer William Porter in Death of Freddie Gray

Mistrial Declared in Trial of Officer William Porter in Death of Freddie Gray

The defense brought experts that said that Baltimore Police Officer William G. Porter acted as a "reasonable officer" in his interactions with Gray.
The defense brought experts that said that Baltimore Police Officer William G. Porter acted as a “reasonable officer” in his interactions with Gray.

[THE BALTIMORE SUN]

A mistrial was declared Wednesday in the trial of Baltimore Police Officer William G. Porter, after jurors told a judge they could not reach a verdict on any of the four charges against him.

“I do declare a mistrial,” Judge Barry G. Williams announced in a downtown courtroom.

Porter, 26, was charged with involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office. He is the first of six city police officers to stand trial in the death of Freddie Gray.

Attorneys are expected to appear in court Thursday morning in front of an administrative judge to pick a retrial date. Porter is not scheduled to attend.

It’s unclear whether Porter’s retrial will affect the trial dates for the other five officers, who are scheduled to be tried separately and consecutively beginning Jan. 6.

The State’s Attorney’s Office did not comment Wednesday, citing a “gag order that pertains to all cases related to Freddie Gray.”

Gray, 25, suffered a broken neck and severe spinal cord injury in the back of a police transport van after his arrest on April 12. His death a week later prompted widespread protests against police brutality, and his funeral was followed by the most intense rioting and looting in the city since the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.

Finish reading the story at The Baltimore Sun.