Love Coffee? Your Heart May, Too

Love Coffee? Your Heart May, Too

In this Friday, Feb. 6, 2009 photo, the owner of a coffee shop serves cappuccinos to judges during a barista competition in Cranberry, Pa. Scientists have long known that one's genes influence how much of coffee one consumes, and a study released Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 by the journal Molecular Psychiatry has identified some genes that may play a role. Their apparent effect is quite small. But variations in these genes may modify coffee’s effect on a person’s health, and so such genetic research may help scientists explore that, said Marilyn Cornelis of the Harvard School of Public Health. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
In this Friday, Feb. 6, 2009 photo, the owner of a coffee shop serves cappuccinos to judges during a barista competition in Cranberry, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

 

(HealthDay News) — Drinking three to five cups of coffee a day may reduce the risk of developing clogged arteries, which in turn might reduce the risk for heart attack, a new study suggests.

“We found that drinking three to five cups a day was associated with less calcium build-up in the arteries,” said researcher Dr. Eliseo Guallar, a professor from the department of epidemiology and medicine at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

Calcium build-up is an early sign of hardening of the arteries and the risk for heart disease, he explained.

Guallar said that this study cannot show a direct cause-and-effect relationship between coffee and reduced calcium in the arteries, but noted that the association between these factors is very strong.

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