Kenyans Agonize Over Student Massacre

Kenyans Agonize Over Student Massacre

Kenya Red Cross staff assist a woman after she viewed the body of a relative killed in Thursday's attack on a university, at Chiromo funeral home, Nairobi, Kenya, Friday, April 3, 2015. Al-Shabab gunmen rampaged through a university in northeastern Kenya at dawn Thursday, killing scores of people in the group's deadliest attack in the East African country. Four militants were slain by security forces to end the siege just after dusk. (AP Photo)
Kenya Red Cross staff assist a woman after she viewed the body of a relative killed in Thursday’s attack on a university, at Chiromo funeral home, Nairobi, Kenya, Friday, April 3, 2015. (AP Photo)

 

GARISSA, Kenya (Wall Street Journal) – One year ago, President Uhuru Kenyatta declared on television that the era of insecurity was over for Kenyans. He vowed that closed-circuit cameras capable of picking faces out of crowds and relaying information to authorities would soon dot major cities and towns.

“Terrorists, criminals, thugs, run and hide, because there will be thousands of cameras and millions of pairs of eyes watching you,” he said.

But on Friday, Kenyans wondered about their security a day after a rampage at a college in which Islamists killed at least 147 students—1½ years after a shopping-mall massacre that left 67 people dead prompted Mr. Kenyatta’s pledges. Both attacks were claimed by Somalia-based Islamist group al-Shabaab.

Students at the Garissa University College said militants burst through the campus gates and began to indiscriminately shoot people, both Muslims and Christians. By nightfall, a least 147 students were dead along with the four assailants. More bodies were being recovered on Friday, said officials in Garissa and students who survived.

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