Kentucky Black Leaders v. Rand Paul

Kentucky Black Leaders v. Rand Paul

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks to reporters after voting at Briarwood Elementary School in Bowling Green, Ky., on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, Austin Anthony)
U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks to reporters after voting at Briarwood Elementary School in Bowling Green, Ky., on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, Austin Anthony)

 

(Politico) – Over the past year-and-a-half, Sen. Rand Paul has spoken at historically black colleges, gathered with African American leaders in Ferguson, Missouri after the shooting of Michael Brown, and criticized a justice system he says unfairly targets minorities. His message is unmistakable: I’m a different kind of Republican who’s not afraid to engage with communities that typically vote for Democrats.

Yet in 2010, when he was a long-shot tea party candidate for Senate, and during his first two years in the job, Paul was rarely seen or heard from in Kentucky’s African American community, according to interviews with more than a dozen black leaders in the Bluegrass State, including seven of the eight African American state legislators. Indeed, his much-publicized courtship has occurred almost entirely as the Republican began plotting a potential run for president.

The officials, almost all Democrats, largely agreed that Paul deserves credit for spending time in minority communities and addressing issues that haven’t been high on the GOP’s priority list. But many were skeptical that Paul is acting out of long-held beliefs about racial injustice, given his earlier absence and his controversial 2010 remarks questioning whether the Civil Rights Act should apply to private businesses, which he’s sought to surmount ever since.

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