fbpx
Connect with us

Sports

Jets Trying to Stay Grounded After 20-7 Win at Indianapolis

Published

on

New York Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis (24) recovers a fumble by Indianapolis Colts running back Frank Gore (23) during the second half of an NFL football game in Indianapolis, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

New York Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis (24) recovers a fumble by Indianapolis Colts running back Frank Gore (23) during the second half of an NFL football game in Indianapolis, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

MICHAEL MAROT, AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Todd Bowles is keeping the Jets grounded.

Sure, they’re off to their first 2-0 start since 2011, the defense forced five more turnovers Monday night against Andrew Luck and, of course, the New York fans are already revving up for more after a 20-7 win at Indianapolis. Bowles knows there’s still a lot of work to be done.

“It’s a good win, but it’s only win No. 2,” the first-year Jets coach said after a 20-7 victory at Indianapolis. “We’re not where we want to be, but we’re on the way.”

The defense might not be able to get much better.

New York already has five takeaways in the first two games and has scored 31 points off those miscues after producing only 20 points all of last season.

The reason is that they’ve been able to relentlessly pressure quarterbacks and lock down outside receivers with their two veteran cornerbacks, Darrelle Revis and Antonio Cromartie, who played Monday on a sore knee.

But there was plenty to critique about the Jets’ offense, which struggled to seal the game until the closing minutes.

Ryan Fitzpatrick was 22 of 34 for 244 yards with two touchdowns and one interception in his first win at Lucas Oil Stadium, Brandon Marshall caught seven passes for 101 yards and one TD and Eric Decker caught eight passes for 97 yards and a TD before leaving with a knee injury.

“It wasn’t a pretty win, but we’ll take it,” Marshall said. “We’ve got a long way to go.”

So do the Colts who failed to score in the first half for the second straight week — something they last did in consecutive games in 1997.

Indy is 0-2 for second consecutive season, but this time seems a lot different. After going 21 of 37 for 250 yards with one touchdown and three interceptions, Luck has now thrown five picks in the first two weeks. He also lost a fumble to the Jets.

And fans, who were so eager to see Robert Mathis return and Jeff Saturday inducted into the team’s ring of honor, booed heartily as the problems mounted.

Fitzpatrick’s 6-yard TD pass to Decker and a 35-yard field goal from Nick Folks made it 10-0 at halftime.

Luck finally answered with a 26-yard touchdown pass to Donte Moncrief early in the fourth quarter, but Fitzpatrick threw a 15-yard TD pass to Marshall and Folk made a 46-yard field goal to close out the scoring.

Here are some other takeaways from Monday’s game:

THE PENAL CODE: When the Jets’ defense wasn’t forcing miscues, the Colts were their own worst enemy. They were called for 11 penalties and the steady stream seemed to continually bring back big plays and stall drives. “I don’t think we’re a perfect, well-oiled machine right now. You’re never that in the second week of the season,” Luck said.

REVIS RULES: Revis has long been a thorn in the side of the Colts, and he was at it again Monday. The veteran cornerback recovered two fumbles including one in his own end zone to stop one Indy drive and picked off Luck once, too.

INJURY WATCH: Decker is expected to have an MRI on his injured knee Tuesday. But the injuries could be more problematic for Indy. The Colts started the game without cornerbacks Greg Toler (neck) and Darius Butler (hip) and finished the game without their top cornerback Vontae Davis (concussion). Tight end Dwayne Allen also did not return after injuring his ankle.

RUNNING IN PLACE: Both teams had trouble running. Chris Ivory led the Jets with 14 carries for 57 yards, but New York averaged just 3.7 yards on 27 carries against a defense that struggled to stop the Bills last week. Gore, meanwhile, started fast but finished with 15 carries for 57 yards and the fumble. Indy wound up with 24 carries for 93 yards.

___

Online:

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and http://twitter.com/AP_NFL

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Serena Williams gets first Wheaties box cover, hopes to inspire next generation

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion”

Published

on

Wheaties Box Cover with Serena Williams (Photo by: General Mills)

By Paige Elliot

The tennis champ follows in the footsteps of Althea Gibson

Serena Williams started July off with a bang, becoming the new face on the cover of Wheaties cereal boxes. The cereal giant announced the honor on June 25 with a tweet: “She’s an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. She’s a philanthropist. She’s a mother. @serenawilliams is a Champion. #ShesAChampion

For Williams, the achievement fulfills a long-held goal. “I have dreamt of this since I was a young woman and it’s an honor to join the ranks of some of America’s most decorated athletes,” Williams said in a press release.

One of those decorated athletes includes tennis great Althea Gibson, who became the first Black female tennis player to grace Wheaties cover in 2001.

On Instagram, Williams made sure her 11.1M followers knew the score. “In 2001, Wheaties paid homage to a true champion and an icon by putting her on the cover of a Wheaties Box. Althea Gibson was the FIRST Black Woman tennis player to be on the box. Today, I am honored to be the second.”

Gibson and Williams are among just a handful of Black women to covet a “Breakfast of Champions” cover. Gymnast Dominique Dawes received hers in 1996 and Olympian Jackie Joyner-Kersee in 2004.

“Serena exemplifies all of the personal attributes that Wheaties looks for when choosing who its next champion will be,” stated Wheaties Marketing Manager Tiffani Daniels in a press release. “On the court, she has been named the women’s most valuable player seven times, while off the court she uses her voice to inspire and spark change to make the world a better place.”

Williams, widely considered one of the greatest athletes of all time, is currently competing at Wimbledon in both women’s singles and mixed doubles with Andy Murray. She’s on a quest for a 24th Grand Slam singles title. She’s won 14 Grand Slam doubles titles and four Olympic gold medals.

The limited-edition Wheaties box featuring Williams will be on the shelves for the month of July. “I hope my image on this iconic orange box will inspire the next generation of girls and athletes to dream big,” said Williams.

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder.

Continue Reading

Afro

Bodden Foundation to Address Mental Health

THE AFRO — Former NFL defensive back and Prince George’s County native Leigh Bodden knows all too well about dealing with pain and putting on a brave face.  Most of Bodden’s contemporaries hid behind the mask on the field and in the locker room, as it was recognized as a sign of weakness if there were moments of vulnerability that exposed mental health issues.

Published

on

The Leigh Bodden Foundation in partnership with Lauryn’s Law, is collaborating to raise awareness about the causes of suicide and mental illness in Maryland. (Courtesy Photo)

By Mark F. Gray

Former NFL defensive back and Prince George’s County native Leigh Bodden knows all too well about dealing with pain and putting on a brave face.  Most of Bodden’s contemporaries hid behind the mask on the field and in the locker room, as it was recognized as a sign of weakness if there were moments of vulnerability that exposed mental health issues.

Bodden has also seen how the effects of not dealing with mental health issues can have fatal consequences.  So as he did during his eight-year pro football career, he’s attacking the unspoken killer of so many people in his community head on.

The Leigh Bodden Foundation in partnership with Lauryn’s Law, is collaborating to raise awareness about the causes of suicide and mental illness in Maryland.  It will kickoff during a charity kickball game August 4 at Bowie Baysox Stadium. A group of local celebrities and former professional athletes will compete following the Baltimore Orioles Minor League affiliate’s game.  Their goal is to address these very personal issues that plague so many Americans and raise money to help those who have been affected.

“There are stresses in life that affect people in different ways,” Bodden told the AFRO.  “People need to understand when they need to talk to someone about their problems they shouldn’t be ashamed.  Suicide is not like cancer or HIV, its a silent killer.”

Bodden personally understands the devastation of mental health issues leading to suicide.  When he played for the New England Patriots, two of his former teammates would ultimately take their lives prematurely.  He recalls how Hall of Fame linebacker Junior Seau was one of the most gregarious and fun loving players in the locker room.  However, after he retired his life spiraled downward to the point where he committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest in 2012.

Former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez also led a destructive life, which ended his career as he appeared to be on the cusp of greatness.  After signing a massive free agent contract he was convicted of killing Odin Lloyd and sentenced to life in prison in a well publicized case. He also ended his life by committing suicide while in jail.

Those deaths were attributed to chronic traumatic encephalopathy

known as CTE. CTE is a degenerative brain disease that has been linked to repeated hits to the head and is common in former NFL players who have taken their lives.  The onset of CTE developed because of brain damage that began while Seau and Hernandez were playing football.

However, the game changer for Bodden was the death of his best friend Barry who committed suicide after struggling with personal issues that he never talked about.  Barry never opened up about the feelings that were beneath the surface after he had been bullied. Bodden still recounts how he could have been an ear to listen for his fallen friend.

To honor that relationship, “Barry’s Game” is what the charity kickball game will be known as, and it also served as the impetus for his foundation to partner with Lauryn’s Law.  Lauryn’s Law requires that school counselors receive proper training to spot warning signs of mental illness, trauma, violence or substance abuse.

The law was passed in 2013 after Lauryn Santiago took her own life at 15 years-old. In the months leading up to Lauryn’s death, her mother Linda Diaz, was aware that her child was facing difficulty at school. Lauryn’s mother reached out to the school and asked for the counselor to set up a meeting with Lauryn about being bullied but it was too late.

This article originally appeared in The Afro

Continue Reading

Afro

Highlighting BSU 2019 HOF Class

THE AFRO — Two former NFL players, a two-time championship winning basketball coach, a three time CIAA Track Coach of The Year, and a championship team headlined the Bowie State Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2019 during its banquet June 29 at the Marriott BWI Airport Hotel.

Published

on

Bowie State University held its Hall of Fame banquet on June 29 at the Marriott BWI Airport Hotel and honored several standout athletes and coaches, including current men’s basketball head coach Darrell Brooks. (Courtesy Photo)

By Mark F. Gray

Two former NFL players, a two-time championship winning basketball coach, a three time CIAA Track Coach of The Year, and a championship team headlined the Bowie State Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2019 during its banquet June 29 at the Marriott BWI Airport Hotel.

Approximately, 350 people were on hand as several contemporary Bowie State University (BSU) athletes and coaches were honored for their individual success that led to championships in football, basketball, and women’s track & field.

Current men’s basketball coach Darrell Brooks took his place in the BSU Hall of Fame in the same year where he earned a postgraduate degree from his alma mater as well.  Brooks was a student-athlete who played basketball for the Bulldogs as an undergraduate,has returned to become arguably its most successful men’s basketball coach in school history.

When Brooks left the Bronx, New York in 1974 he never envisioned BSU would literally change his life. He has led the Bulldogs to CIAA Basketball championships in 2013 and 2017 when he was also named Coach of the Year. Brooks is second-all-time in victories after rebuilding the program following a successful tenure as an assistant coach at George Washington University under Karl Hobbs.

While earning his place in Bulldogs lore, Coach Brooks also had the chance to share his Hall of Fame moment with his team that was inducted as well.  Brooks’ first CIAA Championship team from 2013 joined its leader for a unique place in HBCU sports history.

The irony of that season was that the expectations were limited because of disappointing conclusions to the previous seasons where they were prohibitive favorites only to fall short.  That team personified getting hot at the right time as they won four games in four nights to win the title.

However, that season began with four straight losses and with 11 upperclassmen, tensions grew as they approached the tournament following three consecutive wins to close out the regular season.  Behind the brilliant individual performance of senior Byron Westmoreland, they concluded one of the greatest Tournament runs in CIAA to win the title. In the finals Westmoreland scored 38 points to lead BSU to the upset over Livingstone and earned the most outstanding player award.

Former women’s track coach Marc Harrison was honored as well after building a program from ground zero.  Harrison was named CIAA Coach of the Year from 2004 – 2006 and trained 35 all-American athletes while coaching at BSU.  His 2006 team, which is also in the Hall of Fame, won the CIAA Women’s Outdoor Championship and beat the dynastic St. Augstine’s program coached by legendary George “Pup” Williams.  It was the first championship won in that program’s history.

Harrison was inducted with two of his former athletes this year.  Tyhler Johnson was team captain of that 2006 team and won the 60 meter indoor championship also.  Damara Parrish was an all-CIAA long jumper on that 2006 team was also a member of the class of 2019.

Former NFL players Isaac Redmon and Chuck Alston were honored as well.  Alston played for the Dallas Cowboys, Atlanta Falcons and Tampa Bay Buccaneers during four NFL seasons before a four-year Canadian Football League career with the Edmonton Eskimos. He also earned the distinction of being the only NCAA student-athlete who played football and basketball games in the same day and those uniforms are in their Hall of Fame.

Redmond was a member of the Pittsburgh Steelers XLV AFC Championship team that lost to the Green Bay Packers.  He graduated as BSU’s all time rushing leader with 3,300 yards and rushed for 1,148 five TDs in his NFL career.

This article originally appeared in The Afro

Continue Reading

Black History

Local legend referee excelled in more than sports

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception. The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

Published

on

Jim Robinson (Photo by: Charles Hallman | MSR News)
By Charles Hallman
It’s been said that any two people on Earth are at least six acquaintance links apart. James “Jim” Robinson is no exception.

The late Bill McMoore first hired Robinson, then a St. Paul high-schooler, to referee games at Hallie Q. Brown. McMoore, as Minneapolis Public Schools athletic director in the early 1980s, gave me my first high school basketball coaching job in Minnesota.

Ed Prohofsky, who succeeded McMoore as MPS AD, saw me attending local basketball coaching clinics and told McMoore about me. Both he and Robinson sit together at Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx games, and this columnist purposely pays his respects to these two elders.

After high school, Robinson was convinced by the late James Griffin, St. Paul’s first Black deputy fire chief, to pursue officiating as a second career and began to ref all over the state of Minnesota. I got to know Griffin, who along with Jimmy Lee was one of the first Black officials in Minnesota. He often advised me on my writing.

I first met Robinson when the late Kwame McDonald, a colleague, mentor and friend, introduced us at the summer league he ran and asked me to coach in the late 1980s. McDonald once coached Lisa Lissimore, the Minneapolis Public Schools(MSHSL) associate director, on the Summit-University women’s basketball team.

Lissimore recommended Robinson for one of the seven NCAA Living Legend awards handed out during the Men’s Final Four in April. She included a Black History Month piece I wrote in 2018 as part of her supporting documentation.

If you’re keeping count, that’s five degrees of separation of James Robinson, the first Black official to referee in the Minnesota State Boys’ Basketball Tournament in the 1970s; in total, he worked seven state tournaments. He refereed both football and basketball for many years in the Twin Cities and throughout Minnesota, then focused solely on hoops both at the high school and college levels.

The Big Ten selected Robinson in 1971 as a basketball official, and he became one of the first Black referees to work Division I sports. He worked Big Ten, Division I, II, and III games for 16 years before a knee injury forced him to retire. He then became a supervisor of officials both for the Big Ten and as MSHSL high school basketball officials coordinator and supervisor ever since.

A longtime advocate for Black officials, Robinson for many years has held officiating camps, helped found a minority officials association in Minnesota, and was a National Federation of Basketball Rules Writing Committee member.

During the late 1960s, local community folk approached Robinson to apply for the director of the Summit University Teen Center, which was developing a new social services concept, the “drop-in center.” He has now been at “The Loft” since 1967.

What I didn’t know about Robinson was that he is a master barber and served on the Minnesota Board of Barber Examiners. I later learned that as a youngster growing up in St. Paul he was the first Black elected as the citywide student chief of the school patrol boys, and as a teenager was selected to attend Minnesota’s Boys State where his peers selected him “Mayor of Boy’s State.”

Robinson’s impressive resume includes inductions into the Minnesota Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Honor and the MSHSL Hall of Fame.

“Who determines a legend?” Robinson, ever modest, responded when asked where the NCAA Living Legend honor ranks. “I would not rank [myself] so high.”

This article originally appeared in the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Continue Reading

Florida Courier

CDC issues warning about ‘crypto’ in pools, water parks

FLORIDA COURIER — Outbreaks of “crypto,” a parasite found in swimming pools that causes long-term diarrhea, are on the rise, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The CDC says outbreaks of the summertime parasite increased an average of 13% each year from 2009-17.

Published

on

The fecal parasite can survice for days in chlorinated water in pools and water playgrounds (Photo by: Dreamstime | TNS)

By Stephanie Sigafoos

Outbreaks of “crypto,” a parasite found in swimming pools that causes long-term diarrhea, are on the rise, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

The CDC says outbreaks of the summertime parasite increased an average of 13% each year from 2009-17.

Cryptosporidium is spread through the infected fecal matter of humans or animals. The CDC says people have been getting sick after swallowing the parasite in contaminated water or food or after coming in contact with infected people or animals.

It is said to be the leading cause of disease outbreaks in the United States linked to water, specifically outbreaks linked to public pools or water playgrounds.

Kids susceptible

According to the report:

  • 35% of outbreaks were linked to treated swimming water in places like pools or water playgrounds
  • 13% were linked to contact with infected people in childcare settings
  • 15% were linked to contact with cattle, and 3% to drinking raw milk or apple cider

Young children are particularly susceptible to spreading the disease and experiencing severe symptoms, said registered nurse Michele Hlavsa, chief of CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program.

“They don’t know how to use the toilet and wash their hands, or are just learning how,” she said. “But we as parents can take steps to help keep our kids healthy in the water, around animals, and in childcare.”

Tough to kill

The concern with crypto, according to the CDC, is that it’s tough to kill.

It can survive for days in chlorinated water in pools and water playgrounds, and even on surfaces disinfected with chlorine bleach.

Someone sick with crypto can have diarrhea for up to three weeks.

Outbreaks of crypto are most common in the summer, the report says, and anyone with diarrhea should not swim or enter public pools or playgrounds.

Children sick with diarrhea should stay at home and away from child-care facilities.

This article originally appeared in the Florida Courier

Continue Reading

Hip-Hop

US Women’s soccer champ Megan Rapinoe quotes Nipsey Hussle after victory

ROLLINGOUT — To call soccer superstar Megan Rapinoe “bold” is an understatement. She is one of the few athletes audacious enough to take up the cause with Colin Kaepernick and kneel during the play of the national anthem. She has publicly declared that she may never sing the “Star-Spangled Banner” again because of the multiple instances of inequality in America.

Published

on

Megan Rapinoe with girlfriend, WNBA legend Sue Bird, after the USA Women’s soccer team took home the World Cup. (Photo: Instagram – @mrapinoe)

By Terry Shropshire

To call soccer superstar Megan Rapinoe “bold” is an understatement.

She is one of the few athletes audacious enough to take up the cause with Colin Kaepernick and kneel during the play of the national anthem. She has publicly declared that she may never sing the “Star-Spangled Banner” again because of the multiple instances of inequality in America.

Most of all, Rapinoe generated all kinds of quakes when she told outlet “Eight by Eight” that she’s “not going to the f—-ing White House” if the U.S. women’s national soccer team won the World Cup — which it did — inciting a vicious backlash from the right wing of America, especially from the Oval Office.

Furthermore, when Rapinoe won the most valuable player of the record-breaking U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT) that won the World Cup on Sunday, July 8, 2019, one of the first things she did during the post celebratory festivities, was quote the late, legendary rapper, Nipsey Hussle.

Rapinoe, an activist athlete who ardently advocates for gender and racial equality, posted this message on her Instagram page as an ode to the slain founder of The Marathon Clothing store in South Los Angeles.

Rapinoe, who is dating basketball legend Sue Bird of the WNBA, has also quoted Martin Luther King Jr. as sort of a clue into her sociopolitical philosophy.

This article originally appeared in Rollingout.com. 
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Latest News

%d bloggers like this: