Is Type 2 Diabetes Caused by Bacteria in the Gut?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonies from a patient grow in a blood agar plate. The white areas around the colonies indicate where MRSA infection is attacking and destroying the red blood cells. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times/AP Photo)
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonies from a patient grow in a blood agar plate. The white areas around the colonies indicate where MRSA infection is attacking and destroying the red blood cells. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times/AP Photo)
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonies from a patient grow in a blood agar plate. The white areas around the colonies indicate where MRSA infection is attacking and destroying the red blood cells. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times/AP Photo)

(Daily Mail) – Bacteria responsible for common skin infections, food poisoning and MRSA could also trigger one of the most prevalent diseases of our time – type 2 diabetes.

Researchers in the US discovered exposure to Staphylococcus aureus bacteria causes hallmark symptoms of the disease in rabbits.

They hope their findings will help pave the way for new anti-bacterial therapies or vaccines to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes.

In 2012, an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes, according to the World Health Organization.

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