Half of Dr. Oz’s Medical Advice is Baseless or Wrong, Study Says

Half of Dr. Oz’s Medical Advice is Baseless or Wrong, Study Says

This June 13, 2012 file photo shows television personality Dr. Mehmet Oz during a photocall at the 2012 Monte Carlo Television Festival in Monaco. On Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, Oz rushed to an accident scene after a yellow cab jumped the curb and struck a pedestrian outside New York's  Rockefeller Center. Oz says in a statement that emergency medical crews were already treating the injured woman who had a bad leg wound. He says a good Samaritan made a tourniquet out of a belt for the woman. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau, File)
This June 13, 2012 file photo shows television personality Dr. Mehmet Oz during a photocall at the 2012 Monte Carlo Television Festival in Monaco. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau, File)

 

(The Washington Post) – It’s not hard to understand what makes Dr. Oz so popular. Called “America’s doctor,” syndicated talk-show host Mehmet Oz speaks in a way anyone can understand. Medicine may be complex. But with Dr. Oz, clad in scrubs and crooning to millions of viewers about “miracles” and “revolutionary” breakthroughs, it’s often not. He somehow makes it fun. And people can’t get enough.

“I haven’t seen a doctor in eight years,” the New Yorker quoted one viewer telling Oz. “I’m scared. You’re the only one I trust.”

But is that trust misplaced? Or has Oz, who often peddles miracle cures for weight loss and other maladies, mortgaged medical veracity for entertainment value?

These questions have hammered Oz for months. In June, he was hauled in front of Congress, where Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) told him he gave people false hope and criticized his segments as a “recipe for disaster.” Then last month, a study he widely trumpeted lauding coffee bean weight-loss pills was retracted despite Oz’s assertions it could “burn fat fast for anyone who wants to lose weight.”

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