FBI Covertly Flies Surveillance Planes Over US Cities

This Feb. 3, 2012 file photo shows Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) headquarters in Washington. Just six blocks from the White House, the FBI's hulking headquarters overlooking Pennsylvania Avenue has long been the government building everyone loves to hate. The verdict: it's an ugly, crumbling concrete behemoth. An architectural mishap, all 2.4 million square feet of it. But in this time of tight budgets, massive deficits and the "fiscal cliff," the 38-year-old FBI headquarters building has one big thing in its favor. It sits atop very valuable real estate, an entire city block on American's Main Street midway between the U.S. Capitol and the White House. Just how valuable, the General Services Administration intends to find out. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
This Feb. 3, 2012 file photo shows Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) headquarters in Washington. Just six blocks from the White House, the FBI's hulking headquarters overlooking Pennsylvania Avenue has long been the government building everyone loves to hate. The verdict: it's an ugly, crumbling concrete behemoth. An architectural mishap, all 2.4 million square feet of it. But in this time of tight budgets, massive deficits and the "fiscal cliff," the 38-year-old FBI headquarters building has one big thing in its favor. It sits atop very valuable real estate, an entire city block on American's Main Street midway between the U.S. Capitol and the White House. Just how valuable, the General Services Administration intends to find out. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
This Feb. 3, 2012 file photo shows Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

 

(Telegraph) – The FBI is operating a small air force of surveillance planes flying across the US and registered under fake company names.

The low-flying aircraft are equipped with video cameras and technology that can identify mobile phone users thousands of feet below even if the user is in their own home rather on the street.

The disclosure, revealed in an Associated Press investigation, raises fresh questions about the scale of domestic surveillance by the US government and its tendency to gather information on Americans who are not suspected of any crime.

It comes as the US Senate debates a bill intended to stop the NSA from collecting the phone records of millions of Americans under one of the controversial programmes exposed by Edward Snowden.

A standoff between Republican senators meant that Congress allowed the Patriot Act, the sweeping anti-terror law passed after September 11th, to lapse on Sunday night without voting on a bill to replace it.

READ MORE

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.