FBI Conclusively Links North Korea to Sony Hack

In this July 27, 2013 photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to war veterans during a mass military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea. From "Saturday Night Live" on Oct. 11, 2014 spoofs to the wild theories of journalists across the globe trying to parse his five-week absence from the public eye, the 30-something leader of North Korea has captured as many headlines as he did when he threatened to nuke his enemies last year. This bewildering ability to command attention by doing nothing says a lot about the North’s total mastery of a propaganda apparatus that puts Kim at the center of everything. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
In this July 27, 2013 photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to war veterans during a mass military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea. From "Saturday Night Live" on Oct. 11, 2014 spoofs to the wild theories of journalists across the globe trying to parse his five-week absence from the public eye, the 30-something leader of North Korea has captured as many headlines as he did when he threatened to nuke his enemies last year. This bewildering ability to command attention by doing nothing says a lot about the North’s total mastery of a propaganda apparatus that puts Kim at the center of everything. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
In this July 27, 2013 photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to war veterans during a mass military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

ERIC TUCKER, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration says it’s determined the North Korean government was behind a devastating hacking attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment.

The FBI announcement Friday is the first official statement blaming the isolated country for the cyber-attack.

In the statement, federal officials say they found similarities between the tools used in the Sony attack and previous hacks linked to North Korea.

Administration officials had previously declined to openly blame North Korea but said they were weighing various options for a response.

The break-in resulted in the disclosure of tens of thousands of leaked emails and other materials and escalated to terrorist threats that promoted Sony to cancel the Christmas release of the movie “The Interview.” The comedy is about a plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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