Concussions and Academics: Students With Concussions Worry About School Performance, Study Shows

Dr. Gary Harris hopes to improve the way the Howard University Bison football team combats concussion, using this “Lilypad” Arduino chip to measure impact during games. (Photo courtesy of Howard University)
Dr. Gary Harris hopes to improve the way the Howard University Bison football team combats concussion, using this “Lilypad” Arduino chip to measure impact during games. (Photo courtesy of Howard University)
Dr. Gary Harris hopes to improve the way the Howard University Bison football team combats concussion, using this “Lilypad” Arduino chip to measure impact during games. (Photo courtesy of Howard University)

 

(HNGN) – A new study found that kids and teens that had concussions are worried about their academic performance. This burden becomes more difficult depending on the severity of the symptoms.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most people with a concussion recover quickly and fully but some experience the symptoms for days or longer. Some of the symptoms identified include difficulty thinking or remembering, headache and balance problems, irritability and anxiety, and some sleep problems.

Earlier studies had focused more on the effect of concussions on athletes. For instance, a recent study showed that more than half of football players suffer from concussions during practice. But little is known on the effects of concussions on non-football-playing students.

“Taking them off the field, not putting them back on the field with symptoms, but this is really looking at the student side of the equation,” Gerard A. Gioia, study senior author of Children’s National Health System in Rockville, Md., told Reuters Health.

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