Florida A&M University (FAMU) College of Law
#NNPA BlackPress

PRESS ROOM: Dean’s Advisory Council Forms at FAMU Law with Distinguished Members

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Dean’s Advisory Council Chair John Crossman said, “This is an exciting time to be associated with the FAMU College of Law. I look forward to accomplishing many goals as we work together to build and strengthen ties with the greater Orlando community and this great College of Law.” […read more]

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PRESS ROOM: Professor Dr. Michael Eric Dyson Launches “Conversation Peace,” His First-Ever Tour of HBCUs

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Conversation Peace” is designed to illuminate the historical and current relationship between African Americans and Jews, and spur spirited discussion and dialogue among student guests. The “Conversation Peace” HBCU tour is a presentation of the Philos Project, a national organization part of whose vision and objective is to reach young people—notably future black thought-leaders—to build stronger alliances and foster a better understanding of Israel and geo-political issues. […read more]

At one of his more than 400 school visits, Dr. Shawn Joseph looks on as an elementary student works on a class project.
Education

Dr. Shawn Joseph Unchained

THE TENNESSEE TRIBUNE — As the highly tumultuous period of leadership for the city’s first African-American Director of Schools for Metro Nashville Public Schools comes to a shameful end, Dr. Shawn Joseph showed class all the way while the city will have to watch and see if the Board of Education will claw the new black Director of Schools. […read more]

Until all of us are willing to forego our color and cultural blindness, we perpetuate students being placed on an assembly line to mediocrity, frustration, and wasted, unacknowledged potential. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
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COMMENTARY: Color “Blindness”

NNPA ESSA AWARENESS CAMPAIGN — Our perceptions of the value of ourselves and others often determine our treatment of and reactions toward those we view as less than or not as valued. Wars are fought over cultural and religious differences. Regardless of the injury, all people’s blood is red and all of us can hurt or grieve, regardless of color. […read more]

When they are continually designated at “below basic” on standardized tests and their culture not understood by teachers and test makers, their behaviors are almost self-fulfilling prophesies. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
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COMMENTARY: Classroom Culture Clashes

NNPA ESSA MEDIA AWARENESS CAMPAIGN — …in answer to the question when cultures clash in the classroom, who suffers, we all do! Poorly educated students make for a society that alienates its young, one that is unable to retain skilled and experienced teachers, and a country frustrated with unemployment, under-employment, and an ever-growing culture of violence, fear, and intolerance. Court systems and privatized prisons, along with mortuaries, result when the classrooms act as prep schools for these expensive alternatives. […read more]

Dr. Shawn Joseph
Education

Board of Education Reaches Mutual Agreement With Dr. Shawn Joseph

THE TENNESSEE TRIBUNE — The Metropolitan Nashville Board of Education voted today to buy out the contract of Metro Nashville Public Schools Director, Dr. Shawn Joseph, in a 5-3 vote. Joseph’s last day will be Friday, April 12, 2019. Joseph entered the position in July 2016 and is ending his tenure after slightly less than three years in a district serving more than 85,000 students and 11,000 employees. Dr. Adrienne Battle has been selected as interim director. […read more]

Thomas McClary of The Commoders, left, and Marshall F. Stevenson, a dean at the University of Eastern Shore Maryland, during a Pan African Development Conference at Delaware State University on Thursday. (Photo by: Photo by: Delaware State University | Carlos Holmes)
Education

Leaders discuss HBCUs and the African diaspora

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — Marshall F. Stevenson would like to see students who attend historically Black colleges and universities make a trip to Africa at least once during their matriculation.“ I’ve always been a proponent of that for Africa,” said Stevenson, dean of the School of Education, Social Sciences and the Arts at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, an HBCU. […read more]

Rhiannon Giddens, left, and Uma Peters. (Photo by: Bradley Hanson)
Education

Rhiannon Giddens Mentors 11-Year-Old Banjo Player

THE TENNESSEE TRIBUNE — Rhiannon Giddens, co-founder of the Grammy Award-winning string band, The Carolina Chocolate Drops, is passing her distinctive banjo skills to eleven-year-old musician, Uma Peters through a one-on-one apprenticeship supported by the Tennessee Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program, an initiative of the Tennessee Arts Commission’s Folklife Program. […read more]

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HISD’s Contentious Superintendent Search Comes to a Screeching Halt

NNPA NEWSWIRE — In a letter, state-appointed conservator, Doris Delaney stated that she was using the legal authority bestowed upon her to suspend the search “until the agency has completed its special accreditation investigation” into HISD, specifically related to the serious allegations that five of the trustees – Diana Davila, Elizabeth Santos, Sergio Lira, Holly Maria Flynn Vilaseca and Anne Sung – violated the Texas Open Meetings Act. […read more]

Alabama State President Dr. Quinton Ross Jr. (left) and Lawson State President Dr. Perry Ward sign memorandum of understanding between the two institutions. (Photo by: Ameera Steward | The Birmingham Times)
Education

Lawson State, Alabama State announce historic partnership

THE BIRMINGHAM TIMES — Students obtaining an associate’s degree at Lawson State Community College (LSCC) can simultaneously work on a bachelor’s at Alabama State University (ASU), presidents of the two institutions announced on Monday. LSCC President Dr. Perry Ward and ASU President Dr. Quinton Ross Jr. announced the memorandum of understanding during a press conference at Lawson State. […read more]

Dallas Post Tribune

Congresswoman Johnson Promotes STEM Education at Annual Math and Science Lecture Series

DALLAS POST TRIBUNE — Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson, Chair of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, last week hosted her annual Math and Science Lecture Series at the Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Magnet Center. Supported by the University of Texas at Dallas, this year’s event connected students with former NASA astronaut and physician, Dr. Bernard Harris, a veteran of two space missions. The lecture series is designed to expose students to STEM educations in hopes they may pursue careers in these crucial fields. […read more]

In front, from left, are Winton Hill Academy students Serenity Mills, Aliyana O’Neal, Nakiyah Ray and Janyia New. In back, from left, are Sophia Hanson, National Youth Foundation co-founder; Nikki Maxwell, “Dork Diaries” illustrator; Rachel Renee Russell, “Dork Diaries” author; Julie Dellecave, Winton Hills Academy fourth-grade teacher; Jamee Joppy, NYF co-founder; and Carolyn Crawford, NYF co-founder. Photo provided
Books

Students receive national writing contest awards

CINCINNATI HERALD — Four young students at Winton Hills Academy in Cincinnati recently traveled to Philadelphia to receive their first place awards in a national book writing competition for their book honoring Civil Rights icon Marian Spencer, 98, of Cincinnati. This is the second book for which students at the school have won a national award, and these Cincinnati Public Schools girls are only nine and ten years old. […read more]

Photo by: Pexels.com
Economy

$62B Education Cuts Proposed, College Aid Could be Slashed

PRECINCT REPORTER GROUP NEWS — Every budget defines priorities and values. To put it another way, what’s really important in life gets supported financially. For many families, having a home, food, and utilities usually rank pretty high. Then there are other budgetary concerns like saving for college or having a ‘rainy day’ fund to cover less frequent costs that can be much higher than the size of the next pay check. […read more]

At Princeton, Black Studies has proven to be a popular and successful program. Dr. Eddie Glaude, chair of the Center for African American Studies at the New Jersey campus, believes the burgeoning interest in Black Studies may provide ground for a degree program. (Photo: RollingOut.com via Princeton University)
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OP-ED: Black Studies becomes major factor in social advancement

NNPA NEWSWIRE — At the modern HCBU campuses, most have established courses in Black Studies, but few have departments dedicated to the field. Only Howard and Clark Atlanta universities offer a Master of Arts in Black Studies. Howard is the only HBCU to offer a doctoral program in African Studies; eight traditionally White institutions (including Princeton and Yale) also offer a Ph. D in African Studies. […read more]

Charlene Crowell is the Center for Responsible Lending’s communications deputy director. She can be reached at Charlene.crowell@responsiblelending.org. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
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COMMENTARY: Education Department helps loan servicers instead of borrowers

NNPA NEWSWIRE — …a newly-released audit report finds fault with how the Department of Education (Department) is managing both its loan funds and its 15 contract student loan servicers. According to an Office of Inspector General (OIG) report released on February 12, “borrowers might not have been protected from poor services, and taxpayers might not have been protected from improper payments.” […read more]

Courtesy of Globalizedc.org
Education

Applications Being Accepted for ‘Japan in DC’ Student Summer Program

WASHINGTON INFORMER — Japan in DC, a two-year-old summer enrichment program, gives interested high school students the opportunity to explore and document the presence of Japan in the nation’s capital through its Japan-related individuals, institutions and landmarks. The four-week, project-based program — offered free of charge and touted as fun and experiential — will operate 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Monday-Friday from July 1- 26, tentatively at the Columbia Heights Education Campus in Northwest. […read more]

Photo by: Pixabay | Pexels.com
Economy

Planters EMC offers scholarships

THE TRUE CITIZEN — Planters Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is accepting applications for the Planters EMC Scholarship. All high school seniors who are the son or daughter of a Planters EMC member are eligible to apply. Applications must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 12, 2019, to be eligible for the randomly drawn scholarship. […read more]

Charleston Chronicle

Increasing H.O.P.E. Announces Annual Free Financial Literacy Month Event

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — The Increasing H.O.P.E. Financial Training Center is pleased to announce its 14th presentation of Money Fair Saturday, April 13, 2019, from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm at the Royal Life Center at 4750 Abraham Avenue in North Charleston. In addition to providing financial literacy and education during its annual community outreach, the non-profit organization will host the 2nd Annual Pastors & Leaders Money Roundtable at 11:00 am. […read more]

The Center for Advancing Opportunity (CAO) commends the Education Freedom Scholarships and Opportunity Act unveiled today by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, and bill sponsor Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Representative Bradley Byrne (R-AL), during an event at the U.S. Department of Education. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
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The Center for Advancing Opportunity Commends the Announcement of New Federal Scholarship for K-12

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Under the proposed Education Freedom Scholarships and Opportunity Act, individuals, married couples, and businesses can invest their tax dollars in a K-12, nonprofit 501(c)(3) scholarship granting organization (SGO) and receive a non-refundable, dollar-for-dollar federal tax credit in return. An SGO must spend at least 90 percent of revenue on student scholarships, with the remaining balance available for program evaluation, program administration, or other things. […read more]

Raven Little
Art

Local teen poet wins gold medal at national arts competition

LOUISIANA WEEKLY — When Lusher Charter School senior Raven Little began writing poetry in a seventh-grade creative writing class, her work covered many of the usual subjects in a teenager’s life, like love poems and sports. But after a while, 17-year-old Raven’s focus shifted as she matured and became more aware of the troubles causing strife, disunity and injustice in the society around her. She soon felt the need to tackle those social, political and racial challenges. […read more]

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. is a civil rights leader and the President and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) based in Washington, DC.
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COMMENTARY: Stop Invisible Lynchings in America

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Disproportionately, young African male college students and others are being summarily expelled from college based solely on mere allegations of sexual misconduct violations of Title IX rules without any due process of law or findings of fact. College administrators are arbitrarily determining that these targeted students are guilty and expendable until their innocence is proven. […read more]

Black Voice News

Bumps, Bruises and Scratches at Preschool

BLACK VOICE NEWS — The life of a preschooler is filled with arts, crafts, indoor and outdoor play, making new friend and yes, band-aids and ouch reports, yet when parents decide to send their children to preschool for the first time, one of the most important considerations is that that their children are safe from harm. […read more]

Stacey Abrams (Photo by: Cass Teague)
Education

Stacey Abrams brings wisdom and inspiration to Vanderbilt

NASHVILLE PRIDE — Stacey Abrams, minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives (2011-2017) and Democratic nominee for 2018 Georgia gubernatorial election visited Nashville’s Vanderbilt University this week. On Tuesday, March 19, she sat down with Vanderbilt Chancellor Nick Zeppos in Langford Auditorium for a sold-out Chancellor’s Lecture event. Abrams’ visited the campus for a full day of activities, culminating in the one-on-one discussion with Chancellor Zeppos, followed by a book signing for her intriguing new book, now in paperback with a new Foreword, entitled Lead from the Outside: How to Build Your Future and Make Real Change. […read more]

Dallas ISD poetry slam
Art

Students use the power of poetry to win grand slam scholarships

DALLAS POST TRIBUNE — The inaugural Dallas ISD poetry slam was nothing short of a memorable night at the Edison Learning Center as infectious energy filled the auditorium with excited students, proud parents, and supportive peers. Participating students competed for $10,000 in scholarship awards through a generous donation from business entrepreneur, Roland Parrish. His charitable contribution provides a stepping stone for kids to achieve opportunities in higher education. […read more]

Victor McElhaney
Crime

USC music student killed in apparent robbery attempt

WAVE NEWSPAPERS — An Oakland City Council member March 12 hailed the life of her slain son — a USC student who was gunned down near campus in an apparent robbery attempt — saying he was a musical prodigy who will be remembered as more than just a homicide statistic. Speaking to reporters at USC, Lynette Gibson McElhaney said her 21-year-old son Victor, who was fatally shot just after midnight March 10 near Maple Avenue and Adams Boulevard, is “not a homicide number or statistic.” […read more]

Community

NCNW View Park Section to Award Multiple College Scholarships at “The Purple Hat Affair High Tea” Fundraiser

LOS ANGELES SENTINEL — California students rank well below the national average on the National Assessment of Educational Progress in reading. According to research by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, children who do not read proficiently by 3rd grade are more likely to fall behind academically and dropout of high school compared to their peers who are reading at grade level. Volunteers from NCNW tutor students 6-12 years of age on a weekly basis to ensure students are reading at grade-level proficiency according to the California of Student Assessment Performance and Progress standards. […read more]

Hillsboro High School students at TSU’s Honors Week.
Education

High achieving students from Hillsboro High School interact with TSU’s best and brightest during honors week

NASHVILLE PRIDE — The Tennessee State University Honors College recently hosted 31 high achieving students from Nashville’s Hillsboro High School as part of TSU Honors Week celebration. The Honors College and Hillsboro High are partners in a two-year exceptional student acceleration program called IBDP, or Academy of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, that nurtures students to excel in higher education. […read more]

Photo by: Pexels.com
Economy

The high costs of student loan debt

MINNESOTA SPOKESMAN-RECORDER — For the Class of 2018, the average student borrower graduated with a debt of $29,800 in private and federal loans over the course of a bachelor’s degree. This is in addition to $35,600 in federal Parent PLUS loans approximately 14 percent of parents took out to support their children. […read more]

“This inequity isn’t just about wealth, it’s about race, ethnicity, culture and history,” said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., National Newspaper Publishers Association president and CEO.
#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA Leadership and Other Prominent Black Voices Speak Out on College Exam Scandal

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “The rich have one standard of education and everyone else has another standard,” National Newspaper Publishers Association president and CEO, Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., added in a story written by Black Press journalist Barrington M. Salmon, who also interviewed other prominent African Americans including Virginia entertainment attorney Elva Mason and Former Florida A&M University Law Professor Cori Harvey. […read more]

Armstrong Williams is a conservative columnist. To find out more about Armstrong Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.
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OPINION: Press the Pause Button on College Admissions Outrage

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The reality in many of these universities is that by the time you subtract preferences for minorities, the spots reserved for athletes, the preferences given to the children of donors, the places taken by children of the well-connected, college admissions is a process where the only people seemingly ‘guaranteed’ a spot, are people who have the system rigged in their favor. It’s clear, from reading some of the emails, that many of these parents were trying to ‘rig’ a guaranteed spot for their kid. […read more]

You or your child may disregard subjects like science, technology, engineering and math in school now, but they could be the ticket to a better life.
#NNPA BlackPress

HOLLIE: STEM — Another Way Out for African Americans

WASHINGTON INFORMER — STEM, which stands for science, technology, engineering and math are subjects being touted by the educational sector to help propel kids into careers that will soon, if not already, dominate industries across the country. Real jobs, with real salaries, and a real path to develop a sustainable future. Contrary to what some people say – it’s not nerds who hold these positions – it’s smart people, making a good living. […read more]

Bruce Bassetti was suspended last week after heatedly reprimanding students at Penns Grove Middle School in Southern New Jersey.
#NNPA BlackPress

NJ Middle School Teacher Calls Students ‘N Word’

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “We send our children to school to get an education and learn to be future leaders in the world. We put our tax dollars into public schools, trusting that the institutions will make sure expectations are carried out in a safe environment,” said Walter Hudson, the chairman of the National Awareness Alliance and former Penns Grove (N.J.) school board member. “It’s obvious expectations are not being met in the Penns Grove-Carneys Point School District.” […read more]

Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson is a fourth-term Congresswoman from Florida representing parts of Northern Miami-Dade and Southeast Broward counties. A former state legislator and school principal, she is the founder of the 5000 Role Models for Excellence Project, a mentoring program for young males at risk of dropping out of school.
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Wilson Slams Proposal to Offer Federal Tax Credit for Contributions to Private Schools

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “[Education Secretary Betsy] DeVos’s latest attack on public schools came a day after the New York Times published a report that found an eye-popping $23 billion disparity between white and nonwhite school districts. Although the tax credit proposal authored by Sen. Ted Cruz and Rep. Bradley Byrne would not directly take money from public schools, it is a backdoor voucher program that would lower the federal tax base and thus inadvertently harm low-income urban and rural school districts.” […read more]

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VIDEO: Esteemed Journalists Keep It Real During Howard University’s Power of the Pen Panel

HOWARD UNIVERSITY NEWS SERVICE — Howard University’s Department of Media, Journalism and Film hosted a panel event, “Power of the Pen,” that featured literary powerhouses Nikole Hannah- Jones and HU alumni Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Jelani Cobb. The writers discussed their work and the importance of remaining true to oneself in the literary and journalism world. NewsVision’s Bryce Newby reports. […read more]