Black Unemployment Remains Very High. But Nobody is More Optimistic about the Economy. Why?

The National Debt Clock is shown Monday, Feb. 1, 2010 in New York. President Barack Obama sent Congress a $3.83 trillion budget on Monday that would pour more money into the fight against high unemployment, boost taxes on the wealthy and freeze spending for a wide swath of government programs. The deficit for this year would surge to a record-breaking $1.56 trillion. The Debt Clock is a privately funded estimate of the national debt. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this photo taken Wednesday, July 16, 2014, job seeker U.S. Air Force veteran Jesse Jefferson, Jr., right, talks to Arianna Alexander, of the Pompano Beach Veterans Center, at a Hiring Fair For Veterans in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Florida led the nation in job growth in June, a sharp turnaround from the previous month. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
In this photo taken Wednesday, July 16, 2014, job seeker U.S. Air Force veteran Jesse Jefferson, Jr., right, talks to Arianna Alexander, of the Pompano Beach Veterans Center, at a Hiring Fair For Veterans in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Florida led the nation in job growth in June, a sharp turnaround from the previous month. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Janell Ross, THE WASHINGTON POST

 
(The Washington Post) — Six years after the Great Recession’s official end, a strong share of Americans say good jobs with decent wages remain scarce, describe economic conditions as bad and expect them to worsen. They also worry about their children’s economic futures, and they continue to see themselves as struggling to get by.

But beneath what might seem like a near-pervasive sense of economic stagnation are some reservoirs of hope that, in some cases, come from unexpected places.

Case in point: a new bipartisan Economic Innovation Group poll that shows black and Latino voters in the nation’s swing states –  Iowa, New Hampshire, Ohio, Florida, Virginia, North Carolina, Nevada and Colorado – were far less worried than their white counterparts about the economy. In the case of black likely voters, they described a far more hopeful picture of both the current and future state of the U.S. economy.

Yes, you read that correctly. Despite unemployment figures that easily exceed those of white Americans and household economic measures that indicate greater fragility, black and Latino likely voters were more likely to describe the current economy as sound and the economic future bright than their generally more prosperous white counterparts.

 

READ MORE

###

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.